3 New Chords: Complete the CAGED Method (Guitar Lesson)


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Chris Liepe

3 New Chords: Complete the CAGED Method

Here in lesson 3, Chris teaches the C, G, and D chords. Once you have mastered the chords taught in this lesson and the previous lesson, you will have learned the CAGED method of remembering open chord shapes. Chris provides a new backing track for you to rock out with. Be creative and have fun with this beginner lesson!

Taught by Chris Liepe in Basic Electric Guitar with Chris seriesLength: 12:22Difficulty: 0.5 of 5
Chapter 1: What Is Covered
- A review of E and A major.
- Learn the G, C, and D chords.
- Play to a click track and a backing track.

Chapter 2: Review
- Make sure you are holding your pick correctly. - Review the E and A major chords.

Chapter 3: The New Chords

G Major
e:3-4
B:0
G:0
D:0
A:2-1
E:3-2

C Major
e:0
B:1-1
G:0
D:2-2
A:3-3
E:X

D Major
e:2-2
B:3-3
G:2-1
D:0
A:X
E:X



Video Subtitles / Captions


Scene 1

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Hi. I'm Chris of JamPlay.com.

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Beginner lesson number three.

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Last lesson we worked on our E and our A chords.

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We looked at playing to a metronome.

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We also looked at playing with a backing track and we went over some strumming techniques.

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If you haven't watched that lesson yet that would be lesson number two.

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This lesson is going to be a little harder to track with
so make sure that you have watched that lesson first.

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Today we are going to be carrying over a lot of those techniques.

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We are going to be playing to another backing track and we will learn three more chords.

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We will be learning chords G, C and D today.

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Once we have those three chords learned you will have learned all of the basic open position major chords.

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What I mean by open is that they include some open strings.

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Meaning you are playing the string but not necessarily fretting it.

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Let's get to learning these chords and then we will work on playing them with the track.


Scene 2

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The first chord we are going to work on today is the G major chord.

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For this we want to use our second finger on our low E string third fret.

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Our first finger on our A string second fret.

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Our pinky or fourth finger third fret on your E string.

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Again that is second finger third fret on your low E string.

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First finger second fret on your A string.

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Third fret on your high E string fourth finger.

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We talked about in the last lesson doing something called chord pushups.

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This is fretting the chord and making sure it's clean.

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Shaking your hand out.

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Putting it back on and taking it off and making sure that it's clean.

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This chord has a little bit more spread in terms of what strings you are fretting on compared to some of the last chords.

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This one is kind of the hardest one out of the batch for many people.

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Don't feel bad if it is hard right out of the gate here.

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The next chord we are going to be looking at is C.

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That is going to be third finger A string third fret.

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Second finger D string second fret.

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First finger second string or B string first fret.

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So your frets and your fingers are doing the same thing they are all lined up.

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There is your C.

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Now on this chord you are not going to play or you can but most people think it doesn't sound good to play your low E string.

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Start with your C note on the third fret there and strum down.

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So going from G to C can be a little bit difficult sometimes.

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For the C chord in the last lesson we talked about thumb positioning

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while I subscribe to the rules I talked about last time

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I generally find that chord C and the D chord

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the next chord we will be working on it is easier to move your thumb up just a little bit.

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You don't want to be way over like this but if you move it up just enough the hand positioning is a little bit easier.

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By the way that was the next chord we are going to work on.

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D.

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First finger second fret G string.

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Third finger third fret B string.

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Second finger second fret high E string.

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Again that is first finger second fret G string.

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Third finger third fret B string.

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Second finger second fret high E string.

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So if we connect these chords.

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Many, many, many songs have been written with just these three chords.

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So if you are able to get these chords down in addition to the last ones we worked on

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you are going to be well on your way to playing your first songs.

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Let's do a quick strumming review here.

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Down stroke.

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Upstroke.

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With this track today we are going to be working on utilizing both of those things.

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This track is going to utilize all three of these chords.
It's not going to utilize the E and the A chord at all.

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We are just going to be focusing on these three.

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Between this lesson and the last lesson it should be pretty easy for you to get a grasp on using these chords in context.

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Generally in most songs you are going to be playing your G with your C and your D chords.

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You are also going to be playing your A with your E chord most of the time

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because of the way music is made up.

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We will get into the reasons behind that later.

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For now let's go ahead and transition to the track.

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I will go ahead and play the track.

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Then we will talk about it afterward.


Scene 3

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Listen as Chris plays along with the track.


Scene 4

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Ok a couple of notes here.

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Listening through to the track and watching me play will give you an ideal of which chords you are playing where.

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The order we are going to be playing this track rather the order of the chords in this track are as follows.

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You are going to do G and you are going to hold this for two measures so two counts of four.

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One. Two. Three. Four. One. Two. Three. Four.

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Next you will go to a D and do that same thing.

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One. Two. Three. Four.One. Two. Three. Four. One. Two. Three. Four. One. Two. Three. Four.

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And now C .One. Two. Three. Four. One. Two. Three. Four. One. Two. Three. Four.

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Back to G. One. Two. Three. Four. One. Two. Three. Four.

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Then it starts over again.

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At the beginning we are just doing strums on the one.

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Then towards the end we transition to doing strums on every click.

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You can do those down strokes like I did or you can do those upstrokes.

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Whichever you are most comfortable with.

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Then at the end we are strumming pretty fast.

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We're actually inserting a strum in between each click which is called an eighth note.

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Up until now we have just been strumming quarter notes for the most part.

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The ending. Again don't feel bad if you can't do that right off.

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When I'm demonstrating these tracks I am demonstrating the depth at which you can use them to practice.

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Make sure that you start out just by doing quarter note strums.

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Look at the different types of backing tracks that are provided.

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There is going to be one that has the guitar included in it so you can listen and follow along.

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Then there is another one that does not have any guitar.

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It is just bass and just drums so you can play along and you can strum how you want to

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within the confines of the time which the track is providing.

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The important thing when you are practicing these tracks is that you are clean and that you're changing on time

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and that you're practicing your transitions between the chords.

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Between lesson number two and this lesson you now have started to learn all of your basic major open position chords.

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For remembering all of those if you have trouble with it a nice acronym to use is the word caged.

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C.A.G.E.D.

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Those are all of your basic open major forms.

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When you are not practicing with these tracks or if you just want another way to go through them

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it's nice to follow that acronym maybe as just a warm up.

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So you start with C. A. G. E. D.

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Maybe you would set up your metronome on a comfortable tempo and just work through

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those strumming and transitioning on the one of each beat.

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That's just another way to practice.

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Hopefully you have enjoyed these first couple beginner's series lessons.

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We will see you soon.


Member Comments about this Lesson

Discussions with our instructors are just one of the many benefits of becoming a member of JamPlay.


PravusPravus replied on February 26th, 2017

This is an awesome lesson. While getting that G chord down all i could think about was Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here and i had to run off and find those tabs! Having a great time with these lessons, thanks much, Chris!

PravusPravus replied on February 26th, 2017

This is an awesome lesson. While getting that G chord down all i could think about was Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here and i had to run off and find those tabs! Having a great time with these lessons, thanks much, Chris!

tomohidetomohide replied on July 4th, 2015

Many use the 2nd, 3rd and 4th finger to play the G code because it's easier to transition from the C code. Is there any reason you adopted the A2-1, E3-2, e3-4 style instead of the A2-2, E3-3, e3-4 style?

Jens98Jens98 replied on February 16th, 2015

thanks man, could you suggest a easy song that i start off with

keltiebrucekeltiebruce replied on March 4th, 2014

Great Lesson Chris. Enjoying the additional challenge withe the extra chords. Now to put the all together. What fun. THX.

yianni54yianni54 replied on January 9th, 2014

Any good tips on anchoring a finger something to make the chord progressions go smoother/easier? Thanks

kingsrkingsr replied on October 21st, 2013

Great lesson Chris! Can you suggest some easy songs based on the CAGED chords?

sithlord95sithlord95 replied on July 5th, 2013

Hi Chris, I seem to have trouble on the C chord. My 3rd finger on the A string. I'm not quite getting the reach on it and its lightly deadening the D string. I'm a bit concerned as this is a widely used chord and even when I'm completely focused on it and jut trying to get clarity I can't get it. Any suggestions? Thanks

milemarkermilemarker replied on July 31st, 2013

Enter your comment here.

fastdrumfastdrum replied on February 17th, 2013

Hey Chris, I'm a total newbie to this. Loving your series, though. I know everyone's different, but just to have a point of reference; at what pace should I be aiming to progress at? A lesson a week? A couple of lessons a week? Today is my guitar's first week's anniversary and I'm feeling fairly confident at A and E chords after a few hours of push-ups spread out over the week. GCD are halfway there. Thx

ej chenej chen replied on February 6th, 2013

I'm just beginning to take lessons and so far you have the best. They are really clear and understandable.

harleys guitarsharleys guitars replied on November 14th, 2012

I like your teaching style !

skye4skye4 replied on January 11th, 2013

Hello Cris, just want to express that that you have a very good teaching style I like it. Also I've always had a desire to play guitar but didn't have time to invest because traveling the world. In saying that I can now focus on learning guitar. I'm also learning navigate thi website with low vision in which I'm legally blind. I enjoy all types music. I'm now embarked in this journey of learning at 60. Just finished the study material on my 1st cords "E and A", moving on to "C,G, and D" cords.

harleys guitarsharleys guitars replied on November 14th, 2012

I like your teaching style !

xiaobozhuxiaobozhu replied on June 5th, 2012

I have a question. when you play up strum of the C chord, do you play exactly five strings?

BuffyLOLBuffyLOL replied on May 9th, 2012

Loving your lessons. My G is kind of a problem. Can I use the third finger instead of the pinky for the first string? Or still for me it feels better if I use the third and the pinky together on the first string, would that be ok, in the long run?

felix johnfelix john replied on March 26th, 2012

Hello all & Chris, Doesn't look like Chris has been here in awhile. Or maybe replies in private. I don't know... I'm 61 & just picked up a guitar 6 months ago. Some things I learned very quickly. There isn't a great deal regarding guitars, in which there is only one manner. Like fingering method's... I can understand the reasoning behind his wanting folks to learn an E (which also transfers going into an A also), starting with the 2nd finger on the G string as opposed to the 1st... But as he pointed out, there isn't just one method. Which was the way I initially learned. (1st finger on the G)... And how I still do it, even during his lessons... There isn't just one fingering, so I stay with what's comfortable to me. Same with a G chord. I'm used to using my 2nd, 3rd, & pinky on the high E. It's easier for me if I use his fingering pattern, as it's difficult for me to stretch across the entire fret board using finger 4 & pinky. (but I have a 'lazy' pinky & needs to be built up)... Also easier for me to practice going from an Em, using the method I (& what some others have asked about), use. (using your 1st finger in an E)... I am in no way answering for Chris, just know (even in my short 6 months), that learning the guitar is a labor of love & music, not just labor. As for playing a D, I have a friend that has 'sausage' fingers. He stopped by one day & I watched as he went through scales & a couple of songs. I was trying to figure out how he was doing that with his fingers. He couldn't explain. 'Course he's been playing for 20 years... Regardless of how fat or short you think your fingers are, it simply happens with practice... 'Bout a month ago, I was going through a set of chords that I try to do every day. I am still very much in a 'visual' mode. When it comes to independent motion, my fingers need to go through basic at an Army base, with a really tough DI. So I'm doing my chords, when something on TV caught my attention, & a couple minutes later I suddenly realized that my fingers had been working on their own. I got so excited, I almost spilled my beer... 'Course, I haven't been able to do it again (yet), 'cause it's hard trying to pretend that my attention is elsewhere. But I know it will happen eventually... As for playing a D chord, one of those that I figured I never would, I can do it just fine now. Nice clean notes... Many moons ago, I was trying to teach someone to drive a manual 5 speed. Eventually she screamed at me, 'you expect me to use both my feet on 3 different pedals, both my hands, steering & shifting, & watch traffic in front & behind me, all at the same time!'... Uh, well, yea. Never occurred to me that I had been doing all these things for years, & never gave it a 2nd thought. Like playing a guitar, it's because of my inexperience that makes it seem difficult. I ask folks how they fret with one hand, strum with the other, sing & do it all without thinking about it... I'm a little old to expect miracles, but never to old to learn something new. And have it so as it's supposed to be. Music is supposed to be fun. When you forget that, then it becomes work, & can make you feel bad & frustrated 'cause you're not doing it exactly like someone else, or how you think it should be. Make it yours. There are no rules written in cement. You take what Chris & others give you, make it comfortable, what works for you, & enjoy. That's what music is. I'm sure what I've written, probably won't go over well. Lord knows, I am not trying to instruct. That's why I come here. To learn. So apologies to Chris & anyone else... Seems like he hasn't been around for awhile. I hope it means that he's been busy, & nothing bad has happened... Actually, I wanted to ask about his gear. I can see you're playing a Faded Studio. A Pro? Did you pop the covers off the pickups? If you did, the 490/498's aren't in zebra on stock models, are they?... Have a good night all, & again, apologies for any intrusion. (BTW Chris, I've tried several instructors on JP, but I always come back to you... Smile a bit)

glyncalowglyncalow replied on April 8th, 2012

Hi, Thanks for being very encouraging. My fingers are adapting well. I have done as you do use what fingers I can.I have just told myself that that is how it's gotta be for now. Transitions much better as well, some are slow some ok. I guess I have left it very late in life to start this, but it is great fun. I also have a private tutor who is very patient, that helps as I give any problems that I am having face to face and we get it sorted. Anyway keep posting re your progress it's interesting for me. I only started in Feb. this year, when I could do absolutely nothing. Now I know all major open chords, couple of intro riffs, now attempting bends( G str 7th fret, then 5th fret then D, 7th fret with bend) Have fun, Glyn.

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on March 26th, 2012

i've had that happen too... where you feel like your fingers perform better when you're focused on the TV or something. It's like everything you have been working on starts to actually work. I think sometimes we tend to overthink stuff and our muscle memory suffers. When we distract ourselves a little, we give our hands a chance to do their thing. Glad you're enjoying the lessons!

felix johnfelix john replied on March 26th, 2012

Hello all & Chris, Doesn't look like Chris has been here in awhile. Or maybe replies in private. I don't know... I'm 61 & just picked up a guitar 6 months ago. Some things I learned very quickly. There isn't a great deal regarding guitars, in which there is only one manner. Like fingering method's... I can understand the reasoning behind his wanting folks to learn an E (which also transfers going into an A also), starting with the 2nd finger on the G string as opposed to the 1st... But as he pointed out, there isn't just one method. Which was the way I initially learned. (1st finger on the G)... And how I still do it, even during his lessons... There isn't just one fingering, so I stay with what's comfortable to me. Same with a G chord. I'm used to using my 2nd, 3rd, & pinky on the high E. It's easier for me if I use his fingering pattern, as it's difficult for me to stretch across the entire fret board using finger 4 & pinky. (but I have a 'lazy' pinky & needs to be built up)... Also easier for me to practice going from an Em, using the method I (& what some others have asked about), use. (using your 1st finger in an E)... I am in no way answering for Chris, just know (even in my short 6 months), that learning the guitar is a labor of love & music, not just labor. As for playing a D, I have a friend that has 'sausage' fingers. He stopped by one day & I watched as he went through scales & a couple of songs. I was trying to figure out how he was doing that with his fingers. He couldn't explain. 'Course he's been playing for 20 years... Regardless of how fat or short you think your fingers are, it simply happens with practice... 'Bout a month ago, I was going through a set of chords that I try to do every day. I am still very much in a 'visual' mode. When it comes to independent motion, my fingers need to go through basic at an Army base, with a really tough DI. So I'm doing my chords, when something on TV caught my attention, & a couple minutes later I suddenly realized that my fingers had been working on their own. I got so excited, I almost spilled my beer... 'Course, I haven't been able to do it again (yet), 'cause it's hard trying to pretend that my attention is elsewhere. But I know it will happen eventually... As for playing a D chord, one of those that I figured I never would, I can do it just fine now. Nice clean notes... Many moons ago, I was trying to teach someone to drive a manual 5 speed. Eventually she screamed at me, 'you expect me to use both my feet on 3 different pedals, both my hands, steering & shifting, & watch traffic in front & behind me, all at the same time!'... Uh, well, yea. Never occurred to me that I had been doing all these things for years, & never gave it a 2nd thought. Like playing a guitar, it's because of my inexperience that makes it seem difficult. I ask folks how they fret with one hand, strum with the other, sing & do it all without thinking about it... I'm a little old to expect miracles, but never to old to learn something new. And have it so as it's supposed to be. Music is supposed to be fun. When you forget that, then it becomes work, & can make you feel bad & frustrated 'cause you're not doing it exactly like someone else, or how you think it should be. Make it yours. There are no rules written in cement. You take what Chris & others give you, make it comfortable, what works for you, & enjoy. That's what music is. I'm sure what I've written, probably won't go over well. Lord knows, I am not trying to instruct. That's why I come here. To learn. So apologies to Chris & anyone else... Seems like he hasn't been around for awhile. I hope it means that he's been busy, & nothing bad has happened... Actually, I wanted to ask about his gear. I can see you're playing a Faded Studio. A Pro? Did you pop the covers off the pickups? If you did, the 490/498's aren't in zebra on stock models, are they?... Have a good night all, & again, apologies for any intrusion. (BTW Chris, I've tried several instructors on JP, but I always come back to you... Smile a bit)

dweatherly81dweatherly81 replied on March 14th, 2012

forgot to mention the G chord as well, I learned with my first finger on the A string second fret instead of second finger, is it worth switching if I have my mind already programmed a certain way?

dweatherly81dweatherly81 replied on March 14th, 2012

Hi Chris, I've been playing on and off for years but I also see you use the second finger on E chord instead of first, it is throwing me off and I can't really switch chords fast enough, I learned with my fist finger, just wondering if I should switch too, in my chord book it shows the first finger which is easiest for me, by the way haven't played in several years. Thanks

glyncalowglyncalow replied on March 8th, 2012

Chris, I need some advice please. i am having two problems with my fretting hand (left) I cannot spread, or create a gap more than a few millimetres between my 2nd and 3rd (ring) fingers. Also when trying to form a G chord when I place my pinkie on the first string I am unable to keep my fourth finger in the air, it follows my pinkie down and touches string 2. Can I exercise, in any way to improve these hand difficulties? Regards, Glyn.

bigjohnbigjohn replied on January 26th, 2012

OH happy Australia Day everyone , love your lessons Chris

bigjohnbigjohn replied on January 26th, 2012

HI chris just picking up my guitar after 20 years or so and noticed that you mostly prefer to use the open cords E and A etc without using the first finger, so I'm a bit confused if i should change my old ways of using the first finger or switch to your method.

eickeick replied on December 15th, 2011

man love your lessons Chris. Hope you stay around for awhile. your lessons are very clear and i am getting a'lot out of them. finally picked my guitar back up after a year. I'm staying with it this time

layzorlayzor replied on December 10th, 2011

only thing that annoys me, i got sausage fingers so they pretty much covers up everything they shouldn't, trying to play an D chord, need surgery precision to put that down.

iqgrayiqgray replied on December 7th, 2011

ok, I am a caged player now, I got but still a little weak on transitioning but all in all i got this, just think a week ago I didn't even know how to tune my guitar now I'm play CAGED major scales, OK whats next I'm ready for the next lesson, LOL.

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on December 7th, 2011

glad you're progressing so quickly! Well done!!

akazukinchanakazukinchan replied on October 11th, 2011

Hello, i just started the lessons on jamplay and i was trying to play the G-C-D backing track, is this song in tempo 80 ? The tab says 75 and i'm not very used to play with metronome so i just wanted to make sure. Anyway thank you for all these good lessons !

sofia2010sofia2010 replied on June 27th, 2011

hey chris great lessons, just a quick question when playing along with the jam track should you always played caged in order or is it ok to try changing through diffeent chord progressions like c, d, a, e as an example

nash24nash24 replied on April 8th, 2011

Great teacher. Thanks for taking it slow and explaining it well.

gilbert716gilbert716 replied on March 26th, 2011

this was a real helpful lesson and a great teacher, he explains things well

laylalayla replied on May 20th, 2010

I don't know if this the right place to post this comment/question, I've worked on the chords in lesson 2 and 3, with the backing tracks and the chords only with a metronome, some of them come out clean others are muted, what can I do to remedy this problem.

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on July 1st, 2010

the "chord pushup" method works really well! fret the chord, play each string individually and make sure they ring out, then take your hand off, shake it out, and try again. Repeat on each chord til your hands get a little tired. The strength and accuracy will come with time. Keep it up!

chikeebabechikeebabe replied on June 12th, 2010

Once again - this is a great beginner lesson. I really feel that I'm making progress. Will definately keep continuing with this series. Layla - for me it's finger positioning and practice. After practicing awhile they chords eventually come out clear.

shayjpshayjp replied on April 29th, 2010

I like the way your teaching. I love the fact that you start us practicing to jam tracks. Just the way I need to learn. Thanks.

coldheartedmiserycoldheartedmisery replied on April 13th, 2010

dude your lessons are pretty awesome these are probably the most clear and understandable lessons to me

ro7477ro7477 replied on March 9th, 2010

where is the backtrack? i would like to play along to it!

jboothjbooth replied on March 9th, 2010

It's all in the supplemental content section.

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on March 8th, 2010

Hey Guys! When you get to the "additional notes" section at the end of the video, be sure you are following along with the provided tab. It'll help things make sense as I'm explaining the chord progression. Enjoy!

Basic Electric Guitar with Chris

Found in our Beginner Lesson Sets

Chris will guide you through the world of electric guitar in this series.



Lesson 1

Introduction to Your Electric Guitar

Chris Liepe talks about the absolute basics of the guitar, including tuning, the guitar parts, and proper technique.

Length: 23:21 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 2

Playing Your First Chords

Chris Liepe introduces you to your very first 2 chords, E and A. Since this is your first chord lesson, Chris also introduces a backing track for you to slowly play along with. Practicing in this manner...

Length: 28:54 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 3

3 New Chords: Complete the CAGED Method

Here in lesson 3, Chris teaches the C, G, and D chords. Once you have mastered the chords taught in this lesson and the previous lesson, you will have learned the CAGED method of remembering open chord...

Length: 12:22 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 4

The Basics to Tablature, Chord Charts, and Musical Notation

Chris is back with his most information packed lesson to date. In this lesson, you will learn how to read tablature, chord charts and musical notation. All of these tools will drastically help you in your...

Length: 25:38 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Lesson 5

Introduction to the Concept of Scales

Chris Liepe is back in lesson 5 with an introduction to scales. In this lesson, you will learn how to play up and down simple scale patterns.

Length: 13:55 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Lesson 6

Barre and Minor Chords

In this lesson, Chris introduces minor chords and barre chords.

Length: 25:23 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Lesson 7

Strum Patterns and Time Signatures

Chris Liepe lays down some grooves in this lesson! He provides instruction on rhythmic strumming patterns and time signatures such as 4/4, 3/4, and 6/8.

Length: 21:12 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 8

All About Intervals

Intervals, Intervals, Intervals! Chris Liepe explains what they are, where they are found, and how to play them in this lesson.

Length: 14:07 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 9

Intervals Pop Quiz

Sharpen your pencils and grab your guitar. It's pop quiz time. Chris Liepe adds to his beginner lesson series with a quiz on intervals. This is a hands-on lesson that will undoubtedly improve your ears....

Length: 15:39 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 10

Triads: Everything You Need to Know

Chris Liepe breaks through his 10th lesson with a detailed discussion of triads. Dig in and take these triads for a ride!

Length: 24:14 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 11

Effect Pedal Mini Series

This lesson begins a mini-series on effects pedals. Chris breaks down routing and how effects work with each other.

Length: 8:20 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 12

Effect Pedal: Compression

The compression effect pedal is one of the most misunderstood pedals around. Chris Liepe finally sheds some light on the subject. By explaining all the different options and sounds this pedal can create,...

Length: 14:12 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Lesson 13

Gain Stacking with Overdrive and Distortion

Chris Liepe is back with the 3rd installment in his Effects Pedal mini-series. He explains the concept of "gain stacking" by combining an Ibanez Tube Screamer and a Boss DS-1 Distortion pedal.

Length: 7:54 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 14

Effect Pedal: Delay

Chris Liepe adds yet another lesson to his effect pedal-mini series. Here he covers the delay pedal. This effect that operates on the principles of time and rhythm. Use this pedal to add depth to your...

Length: 19:52 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 15

Effect Pedal: Chorus

Chris Liepe quickly demonstrates the chorus pedal with some 80's style licks. This pedal can create a deep and rich addition to solos or add the illusion of multiple guitars.

Length: 3:28 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 16

Understanding Key Signatures

Key Signatures! How do they relate to one another? Chris Liepe explains them in lesson 16 of his beginner series. Getting familiar with your key signatures will help pull everything together that has been...

Length: 15:21 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 17

Chord Harmony Basics

Chris Liepe demonstrates how to take a key signature (the set notes within a key) and stack 3rds on top of a root note to form chords. With the help of a modulating backing track, this should be a fun...

Length: 30:02 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 18

Technique Basics: Alternate Picking

Chris explains and demonstrates the very basics of alternate picking. He also provides simple exercises to develop the technique in your own playing.

Length: 16:03 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 19

Technique Basics: Legato Playing

Chris details and demonstrates the fundamental movements and suggested left hand position for legato playing -- specifically hammer-ons and pull-offs. He also provides exercises for developing the technique.

Length: 16:11 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 20

Technique Basics: Palm Muting

Chris talks about proper palm muting and discusses potential snags when first attempting the technique. He offers a number of exercises and patterns to help palm muting become a part of your rhythm playing.

Length: 9:22 Difficulty: 1.0 FREE
Lesson 21

Technique Basics: Hybrid Picking

Hybrid picking can add a fresh dimension to your chord and rhythm playing. In this lesson, Chris briefly covers how to get started with hybrid picking and offers two exercises that you can use to apply...

Length: 6:27 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 22

Major Scale Positions in G (Part 1)

Chris talks about what it means to play in position and teaches three of the five "CAGED" major scale positions in the key of G.

Length: 12:44 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 23

Major Scale Positions in G (Part 2)

Chris continues in his teaching of the five basic "CAGED" major scale positions in the key of G.

Length: 11:39 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only

About Chris Liepe View Full Biography Chris Liepe was born on September 17th, 1981 in Portland OR. His first instrument was piano which he pursued until discovering his love for the electric guitar in high school. He became fans of such groups as Soundgarden, Collective Soul and U2 inspiring him to start singing, songwriting and helping others in their musical endeavors with teaching, co-writing and album production.

Having moved to Colorado with his family, he began gigging, recording and teaching in a number of music stores as well as out of his apartment until deciding to pursue music full time. He moved to Denver, CO to complete a Bachelors in Music Technology and was then hired on by Sweetwater Productions, a division of Sweetwater Sound and one of the largest, most successful recording studios in the Midwest.

Chris spent nearly 4 years at Sweetwater as a producer, recording engineer, studio musician and writer. During this time he had the privilege of working with many artists including Augustana, Landon Pigg, Jars of Clay, and Mercy Me. He also wrote for and played on numerous independent albums and hundreds of radio/TV commercials.

Wanting to get back to his favorite State in the world (Colorado) and feeling the urge to 'go freelance', Chris moved to Greeley, CO and opened his own recording and teaching studio. He continues to write and produce music for artists and agencies and is happy to be among the proud JamPlay.com instructors.

Acoustic Guitar Lessons

Our acoustic guitar lessons are taught by qualified instructors with various backgrounds with the instrument.


Don Ross Don Ross

New fingerstyle instructor Don Ross introduces himself, his background, and what you should expect in this series.

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Mark Lincoln Mark Lincoln

Lesson 40 takes a deeper look at slash chords. Mark discusses why they're called slash chords, and how they are formed.

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Nick Amodeo Nick Amodeo

Nick explains how to play some of the most commonly used chords in the bluegrass genre.

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Calum Graham Calum Graham

Award winning, Canadian fingerstyle guitarist Calum Graham introduces his Jamplay Artist Series, which aims to transform...

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Alan Skowron Alan Skowron

Alan shares his background in teaching and sets the direction for his beginning bass series with simple ideas and musical...

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Randall Williams Randall Williams

In this lesson Randall introduces the partial capo (using a short-cut capo by Kyser) and talks about how it can make the...

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Robbie Merrill Robbie Merrill

JamPlay welcomes bassist and founding member of Godsmack, Robbie Merrill. In this short introduction lesson, Robbie showcases...

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Kaki King Kaki King

In lesson 6, Kaki discusses how the left and right hands can work together or independently of each other to create different...

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Pamela Goldsmith Pamela Goldsmith

Pamela brings a cap to her first 13 JamPlay lessons with another original etude inspired by the great Leo Brouwer. This is...

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Electric Guitar Lesson Samples

Our electric guitar lessons are taught by instructors with an incredible amount of teaching experience.


Steve Stevens Steve Stevens

Steve Stevens shows some of his go-to licks and ideas while improvising over a backing track he made.

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Allen Van Wert Allen Van Wert

Allen shows you the 24 rudiments crucial to developing finger dexterity. This is a short lesson but the exercises here can...

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Alex Scott Alex Scott

Find out what this series is all about.

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Stuart Ziff Stuart Ziff

Stuart delves into all the different aspects of how R&B guitar has had an impact within reggae music.

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Brent Mason Brent Mason

Learn Nashville style country guitar from one of the most recorded guitarists in history. Check out rhythm grooves, solos,...

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Tom Appleman Tom Appleman

Tom Appleman takes a look at a blues in E with a focus on the Chicago blues style. The bass line for Chicago blues is very...

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Mark Brennan Mark Brennan

Mark Brennan teaches this classic rock song by Jethro Tull. Released on the album of the same name in 1971, this song features...

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Nick Greathouse Nick Greathouse

Nick starts his series with Alternate Picking part 1. Improve your timing, speed, and execution with this important lesson.

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Chris Liepe Chris Liepe

Chris brings his ingenuity to this lesson on the American folk song called "Where Did You Sleep Last Night?" Also known as...

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Daniel Gilbert Daniel Gilbert

Known around the world for his inspirational approach to guitar instruction, Musician's Institute veteran Daniel Gilbert...

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