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Blues Rhythm (Guitar Lesson)


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Hawkeye Herman

Blues Rhythm

Hawkeye demonstrates common strumming patterns used in blues music. He also explains how country music evolved from the blues.

Taught by Hawkeye Herman in Blues Guitar with Hawkeye seriesLength: 19:42Difficulty: 1.5 of 5
Chapter 1: (06:59) Blues Rhythm In previous lessons, Hawkeye used simple down strums on all of the quarter notes in the 12 bar blues form. Although this rhythm is used in some basic blues tunes, more interesting and complex rhythms are often used instead. However, do not forget how effective a simple rhythm such as this can be. For some songs, this strumming pattern is most appropriate when supporting a melody line.

Alternating Strumming Pattern

Alternating down and up strums can produce another rhythmic option. Strum down on the strong beats and up on the weak beats. The rhythm of this pattern is comprised of eighth notes, or eight strums per measure. Count the measures aloud like this: "1+2+3+4+2+2+3+4+."

Notice how Hawkeye uses some light palm-muting to dampen the strings. Lightly rest the heel of the strumming hand on the strings just to the right of the bridge. Use your ears to direct you when practicing this technique. Listen to Hawkeye's example closely and imitate what you hear.

Next, listen to Hawkeye sing the melody while strumming in this rhythm. What difference does this strumming pattern make on the overall presentation of the song? After listening to him play through the form in this way, rewind the video and try to play along with him. Repeat this same process with the key of A.
Chapter 2: (06:46) Blues and Country Many of the rhythms in the country genre are borrowed from the blues. For example, the rhythm playing of Blind Lemon Jefferson sounds like country to many people today. If you have been following along with the bluegrass lessons available on JamPlay, you are already familiar with the boom-chuck, also referred to as the boom-tick rhythm. This rhythm features the low bass note of the chord followed by the remaining strings in the chord. Hawkeye uses a nylon thumb pick for the bass note. Then, he brushes upwards with the first finger to strum the chord. Notice how he palm-mutes the low bass note of each chord.

Pause the lesson video and practice playing this rhythm along with a metronome. When you feel ready, return to the video and play through the blues form along with Hawkeye. Be sure to practice this strumming rhythm in all of the keys that you have learned.

Alternating Bass

Repeat the same process while alternating the bass notes. This means that every other bass note in the pattern will be the fifth of the chord rather than the root.

Here are the fifths of each chord in the 12 bar blues progression:

Fifth of E: B
Fifth of A: E
Fifth of B7: F#

When playing the B7 chord, you will need to alternate your second finger back and forth between the fifth and sixth strings at the second fret.

Variation on the Alternating Bass Pattern

Hawkeye also demonstrates a variation on the alternating bass pattern. Instead of strumming once after the bass note, you will strum twice. This creates the rhythm of an eighth note (bass note) followed by two sixteenth notes (strums). Be sure to use a down strum followed by an up strum after each bass note.
Chapter 3: (05:56) Rhythm Variety Hawkeye begins this scene with a review of the blues rhythms that he has taught thus far. Here are the strumming rhythms you have learned:

1. Down strum on each quarter note
2. Alternating strums in an eighth note rhythm.
3. Alternating bass in eighth notes
4. Alternating bass featuring sixteenth note strums. Hawkeye calls this the "boom chicka." Hammer-ons can also be added to the second bass note in this pattern. Hammer from the note 1 whole step below the fifth of the chord.

A Few Thoughts on Rhythm and Speed

Always remember that solid rhythm is the foundation of any piece of music. Before you can play anything fast, you must be able to play it perfectly in time at a slow tempo. Visualizing the chord changes in advance will help you nail them in time. For example, when you are playing the tonic chord E, begin to visualize where your fingers will need to be placed for the subdominant chord, A.



Video Subtitles / Captions


Member Comments about this Lesson

Discussions with our instructors are just one of the many benefits of becoming a member of JamPlay.


joecool1joecool1 replied on September 5th, 2017

Fuck you gameplay your shit ripoff what the fuck is wrong with the feed it keeps breaking up fix it you fucks not happy mf

Jason.MounceJason.Mounce replied on September 6th, 2017

Sorry to hear you are having trouble with the feed joecool1. While we'd prefer that you'd keep the fowl language at a minimum as this is a family place, I can appreciate your frustration. Most often if the feed is buffering, this is a result of your internet connection not being able to keep up with the video's live pace. The best way to counter this is to click the "HD" button found in the lower right hand corner of the lesson video and select a lower quality. This will make the video easier to stream for you. If this doesn't cure your issue, please contact us at [email protected] and be specific about what is occuring. We can continue to help troubleshoot there.

Jay85beJay85be replied on August 15th, 2017

So spent my entire day at work silently singing Blues how do you do...

LilliannaLillianna replied on July 11th, 2017

Good lesson. Thanks Hawkeye.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on July 11th, 2017

Thanks so much for your kindcomments andfor enjoying these lessons. You'll find free guitar lessons at my website: http://www.hawkeyeherman.com/guitar-lessons.htm .... and interesting blues memoirs/articles here: http://www.hawkeyeherman.com/articles.htm ... I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons.

pitbull1779pitbull1779 replied on July 4th, 2017

Committed to year membership after 8 hours of JP Giveaway--although, as usual, I didn't win any on the prizes! I have been playing about 3 months and have faith that I will eventually be able to achieve some basics with your well-organized lessons. I still struggle with barre chords and understanding how to move the different chord shapes around the neck, but it was not that long ago when I struggled with simple open chords, then transitions, etc. Now, after hour upon hour of practice, I do those things almost mindlessly. I hope the other skills will soon be the same! I'm envious of both your skill and the opportunities you've had to meet some of the esteemed blues musicians! I bet they had some great stories! What artists would you recommend beginning blues students listen to for the purpose of really immersing themselves in the genre? Thanks to all the JP personnel and musicians who took time from their holiday weekend during the recent live session!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on July 11th, 2017

Thanks so much for your kind comments and for enjoying these lessons. You'll find free guitar lessons at my website: http://www.hawkeyeherman.com/guitar-lessons.htm .... and interesting blues memoirs/articles here: http://www.hawkeyeherman.com/articles.htm ... I suggest you follow my PhaseTwo bluesguitar lessons in the order they are presented, not skipping around smongst the lessons. Take your time, crawl before you walk,and walk before you run. Don't rush on to thenext lesson until you understandandcan accomplishwhat isin the current lesson. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Thanks so much for 'traveling' with me on the 'blues highway' here at JamPlay.com.

jboothjbooth replied on July 11th, 2017

Are you interested in acoustic or electric, and older or more modern Blues? Hawkeye actually has a pretty good series where he talks about some of the Blues greats. Checking out those, and listening to their music, would be a great start. http://members.jamplay.com/guitar/phase-2/series/271-blues-greats-how-they-play

AcousticbluesmanAcousticbluesman replied on March 3rd, 2017

I just signed up to Jamplay for a 1 year subscription. I would classify myself as as advanced beginner. Started out on your lessons - got to No. 3. Started learning new material already - very impressed. Thanks.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on July 12th, 2017

Thanks so much for your kind comments and for enjoying these lessons. You'll find free guitar lessons at my website: http://www.hawkeyeherman.com/guitar-lessons.htm .... and interesting blues memoirs/articles here: http://www.hawkeyeherman.com/articles.htm ... I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons.

jboothjbooth replied on July 11th, 2017

Glad you are having a good time, and welcome aboard!

AcousticbluesmanAcousticbluesman replied on March 3rd, 2017

I just signed up to Jamplay for a 1 year subscription. I would classify myself as as advanced beginner. Started out on your lessons - got to No. 3. Started learning new material already - very impressed. Thanks.

belindahbelindah replied on November 5th, 2016

like your method....lots

williebobo3047williebobo3047 replied on July 22nd, 2016

this is my first week man I am so glad that I found jamplay I can not believe that I am playing the blues

mpiechowiczmpiechowicz replied on July 14th, 2016

Great lesson, I can tell i'm gonna have me some fun learning from this guy! Really helpful mate - cheers (i'm often trying to run b4 I can walk - excellent point, I keep telling myself great musicians weren't that way until they'd been playin for years. Thanks again Hawkeye :)

BrewzerBrewzer replied on February 25th, 2016

I like Hawkeye's teaching method. Very easy to understand, at this present time.

soulrebel35@yahoo.com[email protected] replied on December 13th, 2015

Do you Have sheet music for this because I get lost on some parts. I noticed that You play for four measures and then you go to two. Please help me on that part.

jefrankjefrank replied on September 1st, 2015

Hi Hawkeye! Thanks for the great lessons! Is it common to use a thumbpick rather than a flat pick when playing blues?

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on September 2nd, 2015

Hi Sarah, Thanks for the question. The choice of using a thumbpick or flatpick, or no picks is up to the individul player and the sound they wish to create. Many acoustic blues players use a tumbpick to free up their fingers fromholding a flatpick and allowing them to use their fingers to pick the sttrings. Some acoustic players use a flat pick. Most electric guitar blues players use a flat pick, but some use a thumbpick. There are no rules. I use a Herco Blue Nylon Thumbpick all of the time ... acoustic and electric. That's MY choice ... that's what I like ... each player must make such 'gear related' decisions on their own, according to their needs, likes, and the sound they want to achieve on the instrument. Your question regarding the thumbpick is the most frequently asked question I get ... there is a 'forum' area here at jamplay where I've answered this question previously. Discussions and my answers/explanations on the choice of picks one uses can be found here: http://www.jamplay.com/forums/hawkeye-herman/4476.htm http://www.jamplay.com/forums/hawkeye-herman/9284.htm http://www.jamplay.com/forums/hawkeye-herman/3924.htm http://www.jamplay.com/forums/hawkeye-herman/9580.htm http://www.jamplaytalk.com/showthread.php?9580-Blue-Herco/page2&highlight=herco+blue http://www.jamplaytalk.com/showthread.php?9580-Blue-Herco&highlight=herco+blue I won't play with any other thumbpick ... I accept no substitutes for what works for me ... that's my choice ... and if you're interested in trying out this thumbpick, here is a good place to order the Herco Flex Blue Nylon Thumbpick, if you can't find it in your local music store: http://elderly.com/accessories/items/PK3.htm Please do check out the forum links I've supplied, as there you'll find my opinions restated, as well as the responses and opinions of others. I hope this information is helpful to you. Thanks again for taking the time to ask. Cheers and Best, Hawkeye

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on September 2nd, 2015

Hi Sarah, Thanks for the question. The choice of using a thumbpick or flatpick, or no picks is up to the individul player and the sound they wish to create. Many acoustic blues players use a tumbpick to free up their fingers fromholding a flatpick and allowing them to use their fingers to pick the sttrings. Some acoustic players use a flat pick. Most electric guitar blues players use a flat pick, but some use a thumbpick. There are no rules. I use a Herco Blue Nylon Thumbpick all of the time ... acoustic and electric. That's MY choice ... that's what I like ... each player must make such 'gear related' decisions on their own, according to their needs, likes, and the sound they want to achieve on the instrument. Your question regarding the thumbpick is the most frequently asked question I get ... there is a 'forum' area here at jamplay where I've answered this question previously. Discussions and my answers/explanations on the choice of picks one uses can be found here: http://www.jamplay.com/forums/hawkeye-herman/4476.htm http://www.jamplay.com/forums/hawkeye-herman/9284.htm http://www.jamplay.com/forums/hawkeye-herman/3924.htm http://www.jamplay.com/forums/hawkeye-herman/9580.htm http://www.jamplaytalk.com/showthread.php?9580-Blue-Herco/page2&highlight=herco+blue http://www.jamplaytalk.com/showthread.php?9580-Blue-Herco&highlight=herco+blue I won't play with any other thumbpick ... I accept no substitutes for what works for me ... that's my choice ... and if you're interested in trying out this thumbpick, here is a good place to order the Herco Flex Blue Nylon Thumbpick, if you can't find it in your local music store: http://elderly.com/accessories/items/PK3.htm Please do check out the forum links I've supplied, as there you'll find my opinions restated, as well as the responses and opinions of others. I hope this information is helpful to you. Thanks again for taking the time to ask. Cheers and Best, Hawkeye

blackie168blackie168 replied on June 20th, 2015

oops sounds gone not gonna learn much there

blind dog taylorblind dog taylor replied on June 13th, 2015

audio drops out after a couple minutes.

MartijnnMartijnn replied on May 24th, 2015

Amazing lesson which is very clearly explained with a little hint to the country variation, excellent!

MTMalsMTMals replied on February 16th, 2015

I just listened to Blues Artist Leadbelly sing "Good Mornin' Blues" on You Tube. It really enhances this lesson.

Southern CashSouthern Cash replied on October 13th, 2015

The Good Morning Blues is exhilarating!

xbeerimentxbeeriment replied on January 28th, 2015

very cool lessons! I love your energy. VISUALIZATION, I SEE IT, NOW I AM GOING TO DO IT!! Great stuff, really helpful. I have trouble getting the B7 down quickly, and this helps!

VijaykVijayk replied on January 18th, 2015

Thank you, Hawkeye! This is super helpful. One question - when you walk through the E-A-B7 at 2:00-2:50 minutes in this video, you do 4 strokes for all the chords. But when you get to the last 4 bars, you shorten to 2 strokes. Is this the norm, or am I missing something? Thanks. - Vijay

rock_111rock_111 replied on October 25th, 2014

Brilliant series of lessons Erik.Keep posting more videos.

larsmohrnielsenlarsmohrnielsen replied on September 24th, 2014

Not only any guitar I´m learning here with the uke my guitar is to big for my workplace ;)

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on September 24th, 2014

Yes, you can play much of the blues music techiques I teach for guitar on the ukelele. Think of the uke as having the first 4 strings of the guitar. All the chord shapes are the same, but a 4th higher, in other words, for example, a G chord on the guitar is a C chord on the uke. Since the uke lacks the two lowest (5th & 6th) strings of the guitar, a G chord on the guitar is played on the uke simply by playing on only the first string of the uke at the 3rd fret, and is called a C chord instead of a G. ;-)

SteveP1961SteveP1961 replied on August 17th, 2014

You certainly make the blues so much easier to understand....

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on August 18th, 2014

Thanks so much, Steve. I'm glad that these lessons are serving your interest in blues guitar. I hope you'll visit my web site: http://www.hawkeyeherman.com ... where you'll find free guitar lessons, articlels I've written about blues history ane the iconic blues masters that I met and learned from directly, and please be sure to click on the 'vidoes' link so that you can see how I use the blues guitar techniques I teach here at JamPlay.com when Im performing at festivals an in concert ... try to play along with me, it's good practice ... and try to 'steal' my licks/riffs/ideas. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Thanks again for 'traveling' with me on the 'blues highway' here at JamPlay.com.

skankinpickleskankinpickle replied on May 3rd, 2014

Whats up hawkeye , love your lessons my dad went to the university of Iowa for school actually. Just have a quick questions is it alright to pluck the strings with the strumming hand rather than strumming with the index/middle finger? Also is it possible to play your lessons with a flat pick or is a thumb pick recommended ? I have just been playing with my fingers (no pick)? Thanks Brandon

skankinpickleskankinpickle replied on May 3rd, 2014

i guess you answered the plucking question in the 3rd scene

barry004barry004 replied on April 30th, 2014

Hey Hawkeye - I am 58 years old and just started to learn how to play guitar in December. I am having a blast. The blues was one of my primary motivations for starting and I think I have come to the right place! It is a real pleasure to learn from your videos - thanks!

Southern CashSouthern Cash replied on October 13th, 2015

I originally started with Blues as well and due to such great lessons here at JP, I have veered into many different genre's, including a touch of Jazz!

wscovelwscovel replied on January 23rd, 2014

Love the bues and the way you present it. I have a question on the E and A chords (maybe the B also) in the tab. The E chords in the tab are not full E chords. It is missing the fingering on the 5th string. Similarly for the A chord. Am I missing something or why aren't these strings indicated in the tab? An E chord should contain the notes E, G# & B. The E chord as written in the tab would be E,A,G#, B.

wayne morganwayne morgan replied on April 25th, 2014

Hi all just started these lessons great stuff hawkeye I think what Wscovel must have ment the boom cick as you don't play the A string its not on the tab,but I think you can still finger the full E, lost me for a sec as well.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on January 24th, 2014

Thanks so much for your kind comments and question, Bill. Much appreciated. I looked at all of the files in the 'supplemetal content' fold for this lesson and it l;ooks to me that the full E, A, abd B chords are notated properly and fully. Please tell me which of those files has the issue you speak of/ask about. Also, may I suggest you view some of the many blues songs that I have posted on youtube ... try to play along with me, it's good practice, and try to 'steal' my ideas/licks/riffs ;-): http://www.youtube.com/user/HawkeyeH ... and please be sure to check out/explore my web site for more free guitar lessons and blues history information: http://www.HawkeyeHerman.com ... I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Thanks again for your kind comments and for 'traveling' with me on the 'blues highway' here at JamPlay.com.

anilsutaranilsutar replied on December 12th, 2013

You are very good teacher .

stratman11stratman11 replied on January 3rd, 2014

Hi Hawkeye, I just started your Lesson Set yesterday and I am in lesson 3. I must say your teaching is great, easy to follow and I have learned quite a bit in these first lessons. I practice over 3 hours each day, play with friends/bands and look forward to continuing throughout the year with your lessons. Thank you and Happy New Year.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on January 3rd, 2014

Thanks so much for the message and kind comments, Don. Very much appreciated. I've given a lot of thought and planning as to the order and content of this lesson series. If you patiently follow my lessons in the order they are presented, progressing from one lesson to the next in your own time/at your own speed/ability, not rushing, you will gain a strong foundation and understanding of blues music and blues guitar that I hope/believe will have you freely playing blues music 'on your own'/creatively for the rest of your life. Please be sure to watch some of my music videos so that you can see how I use the information/techniques that I teach in these lessons when I'm performing at festivals and in concert, and try to play along with me: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=HawkeyeH&view=videos ,,, and there are some free lessons at my web site that you might check out: http://hawkeyeherman.com/guitar-lessons.htm ... Thanks again for your message. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on December 12th, 2013

Thanks so much for your kind comment, Anil. Much appreciated. May I suggest you view some of the many songs that I have posted on youtube ... try to play along with me, it's good practice, and try to 'steal' my ideas/licks/riffs ;-): http://www.youtube.com/user/HawkeyeH ... and please be sure to check out/explore my web site for more free guitar lessons and blues history information: http://www.HawkeyeHerman.com ... I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Thanks again for 'traveling' with me on the 'blues highway' here at JamPlay.com.

lclarklclark replied on August 29th, 2013

Hawkeye, Love your teaching style. Crawling and walking here, but confident I'll get it!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on August 29th, 2013

Thanks for your kind comments, Laura. Take your time, progress from one lesson to the next at your own speed. Please don't bring time pressure/constraints or stress to learning the guitar. Enjoy the process. There is no 'race' and there is no 'finish line' ... the joy is in the journey. ;-) I hope you'll check out my web site www.HawkeyeHerman.com ... and please view some of my many songs on video here: http://www.youtube.com/user/HawkeyeH ... so you can see how I use the techniques I teach here at JamPlay when I'm performing in concert and at festivals: http://www.youtube.com/user/HawkeyeH ... try to play along with me ... it's good practice ;-). I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Thanks again for your message.

styf3885061styf3885061 replied on August 27th, 2013

best teacher ever! i like you! i have to buy more markley strings to get lesson hours but its ok because i really learn from it!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on August 28th, 2013

Thanks so much, Carim. I'm glad you're enjoying my lessons and style of teaching. I appreciate your taking the time to write your positive comments. I hope you continue to 'travel' with me on the 'blues highway' here at JamPlay.com. Thanks again. Cheers, Hawkeye

3deeder3deeder replied on August 7th, 2013

great teacher!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on August 8th, 2013

Thanks so much, R.R. Much appreciated. I love the blues and I love to share what I know. I'm happiest in teaching when I find/discover and utilize more examples/similes/metaphors that clarify any aspect of playing blues guitar. I want EVERYONE who views my lessons to understand what I'm teaching at ALL times, and I'll utilize anything I can think of to make the 'blues music experience' and 'journey' more understandable, expressive, fun, and inclusive as possible. I hope my enthusiasm and passion for the blues is contagious. Thanks again for your kind words.

bbowiebbowie replied on February 24th, 2013

Cheers to you Hawkeye an awsome bluesman and instructor.I sometimes hear your music on xm radio, Would like to see you at the NorthAtlantic Blues Festival in Rockland ME some year.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on February 26th, 2013

You can, if you wish, send a performer request by mail or email to: The North Atlantic Blues Festival Contact Info Festival Hotline: 207-691-2248 Festival Location: Public Landing 275 Main St., Rockland, Maine Office Mailing Address: The North Atlantic Blues Festival, 70 Lake Avenue, Rockland, ME 04841 Phone: 207-596-6055 Email: [email protected]

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on February 25th, 2013

Thanks so much for the kind comments and for listening to my music on XM radio. It so happens that I sent a promo package to the North Atlantic Blues Festival in Rockland, ME about a month ago ... Paul Benjamin, the producer of the event knows my music ... it would be helpful if you sent the NABF/Paul/production team an email requesting that I perform and give workshops at the event. Such events have a tendency to 'listen' to such requests from the public/ticket buyers. ;-) I'd love to perform in Rockland ... and meet you in-person. Thanks again for your kind comments and for enjoying these lessons.

bobnatbobnat replied on November 27th, 2012

Hawkeye, you're an enthusiastic and effective teacher. You're personality is infectious. The visualization technique is priceless. Thanks.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on November 27th, 2012

Thanks for the kind comments, Bob. Very much appreciated. Visualization is crucial to playing the guitar, and is, I'm sorry to say, rarely discussed by guitar instructors. Visualization has been proven to be a most effective means of improving skills in all sports activities and physical activities in general. Visualize in your mind's eye where you are going, not where you've been or where you are currently ... look up the road as you drive a car, not in the rear-view mirror or over the front bumper immediately in front of the car ... visualize where you intend to go ... not where you've been or where you are ... and the 'road' will flow out in front of you. ;-) I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons.

garvs83garvs83 replied on October 16th, 2012

I'm really enjoying your blues lessons. I have only been playing for couple of years - mainly open chord chord songs. Your passion really comes through in these lesson. I think I will be concentrating on this lesson for a while before moving onto the next lesson (although it very tempting) Ryan Sydney, Australia

garvs83garvs83 replied on October 16th, 2012

I'm really enjoying your blues lessons. I have only been playing for couple of years - mainly open chord chord songs. Your passion really comes through in these lesson. I think I will be concentrating on this lesson for a while before moving onto the next lesson (although it very tempting) Ryan Sydney, Australia

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on October 21st, 2012

Thanks for the message, Ryan, I am glad you are enjoying these lessons. Do you know who Fiona Boyes is? anblues gal picker from Oz woho Ihave worked with ... I am now on tour in Europe for a month ... someday I will visit down under ... if you know of qblues festivals in Oz, which there are a few, please do send them an email and request that Hawkeye come there to perform and teach, and perhaps we shall jam together in Sydney someday. Thanks again for the kind message.

garvs83garvs83 replied on October 22nd, 2012

Thanks for the message, Ryan, I am glad you are enjoying these lessons. Do you know who Fiona Boyes is? anblues gal picker from Oz woho Ihave worked with ... I am now on tour in Europe for a month ... someday I will visit down under ... if you know of qblues festivals in Oz, which there are a few, please do send them an email and request that Hawkeye come there to perform and teach, and perhaps we shall jam together in Sydney someday. Thanks again for the kind message. Hawkeye, no haven't heard of Fiona Boyes just starting to enjoy listen/playing the blues... will look her up. qblues festival sound good. I will check it out and send them an email for Hawkeye. Thanks for the festival tip Ryan

eddieiguana1eddieiguana1 replied on July 12th, 2012

Feckin great stuff! You have a nice way about you, thanks!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on July 12th, 2012

Thanks for the kind comments, David. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons.

johnnyrockitjohnnyrockit replied on June 15th, 2012

Love this Hawkeye!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on June 16th, 2012

Thanks, John. Be sure to check out my many videos: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=HawkeyeH ... so you can see how I use the techniques I teach here at JamPlay.com when I'm performing in concert and at festivals ... try to play along ...and 'steal' my licks/riffs/runs. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons.

schuribouschuribou replied on April 20th, 2012

Greetings from FRANCE! It's a real pleasure to follow your lessons. I can feel the passion you have to play blues and to transmit it to everyone that want's to learn it! When I started to play guitar for 4 years ago, I had a teacher that whas passionated like you, but regrettably he left the region where I live when I went retired to move to the south of France, and since I never had again so much pleasure to learn guitar. But the pleasure is back ! Since I found your lessons! Thank you !! Patrick.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on April 20th, 2012

Un grand merci for your kind comments, Patrick. Very much appreciated. I have been to France to perform and teach guitar workshops five times in the last six years for Festival Blues sur Seine in Mantes la Jolie. I will most likely be in France again in Oct./Nov. of this year to perform and present guitar workshop in Paris, Normandy, Lyon, and possible other location. I have visited the countryside in Provence many times and enjoy it very much. You should check out my 'tour schedule' on my web site every now and then to see if/when/where I will be in France in the fall of this year: HawkeyeHerman.com ... also, there are more free guitar lessons at my web site ... and be sure to watch my videos on youtube so that you can see how I use the techniques I teach here at JamPlay when I'm performing in concert and at festivals: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=HawkeyeH ... I suggest you follow my lessons in the order they are presented, progressing at your own speed from one lesson to the next, and you will gain a strong foundation and understanding of blues music and the ability to play/create/improvise freely. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Perhaps I'll see you in France in Oct./Nov. ;-)

schuribouschuribou replied on April 22nd, 2012

Hi herman! Thanks for your answer! It's very kind to take the time to read and answer to the comments you receive. I have already seen that you have a lot of material on You Tube, so I think that with the addition of JAMPLAY and YOU TUBE I'll be occupied for months, or YEARS !! Yesss ! So.....Let's go!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on April 22nd, 2012

Hi Schurrle. If course I answer my students' questions and comments. That's why JamPlay.com is the 'best' ...because the instructors care enough to interact with their students. By the way, my name is Michael "Hawkeye" Herman ... and I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons.

schuribouschuribou replied on April 23rd, 2012

Sorry Michael !! I get your first name mixed with your Family name!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on April 23rd, 2012

;-) No problem. ;-)

schuribouschuribou replied on April 20th, 2012

Greetings from FRANCE! It's a real pleasure to follow your lessons. I can feel the passion you have to play blues and to transmit it to everyone that want's to learn it! When I started to play guitar for 4 years ago, I had a teacher that whas passionated like you, but regrettably he left the region where I live when I went retired to move to the south of France, and since I never had again so much pleasure to learn guitar. But the pleasure is back ! Since I found your lessons! Thank you !! Patrick.

adambeamadambeam replied on April 10th, 2012

Men, your the best teacher I've encountered since pre-school. I got 139 lessons to go to master the blues. haha thanks sir!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on April 12th, 2012

Thanks so much for the kind words and for enjoying these lessons, Adam. Much appreciated. If you patiently follow my lessons at your own pace, progressing from one lesson to the next in the order they are presented you will gain a strong foundation and understanding of the blues that will allow you to play freely and creatively/improvise as you please. "Mastering" the blues is another matter ... even though I've been playing the blues for over 50 years I'm still learning and don' consider myself a 'master,' even though others might call me a 'master.' When soebody thinks of themselves as a master they stop learning and think they know it all ... I will never know enough about the blues, so I'll never call myself a 'master' of the blues. ;-) There's always more to learn. So stick with the lesson plan I've presented here and enjoy the journey with me on the 'blues highway' here at JamPlay.com ... and we will both continue on this joyful musical journey ... toward learning more and more about the music we love ... and let's not worry or concern ourselves about being considered a 'master.' Thanks again for your comments. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons.

laurentlaurent replied on January 3rd, 2012

Hi, Is that a problem if I have a look on my right hand when I strum down on the root note in the Boom-Chuck Style or other style...

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on January 3rd, 2012

Greetings, Bertrais. It takes time, patience, and much repetition in order to play the rhythm without looking at your right hand. Everyone, in the beginning, must look at their right hand in order to accurately hit the the bass notes when necessary. After much patience/practice/repetition, your right hand will start to 'automatically' find the notes on the bass strings without looking and you can then focus on looking at your left hand for chording. Take things one step at a time, and don't expect to be successful in all aspects of guitar playing immediately ... you must focus and teach your right hand 'muscle memory' ... and also your left hand 'muscle memory' ... individually ... separate actions, and then bring the two together in one activity. This does not happen overnight. Enjoy the process of practicing and improving bit by bit toward your goals. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons.

laurentlaurent replied on January 5th, 2012

Thanks a lot, your lessons are very interesting and well explained.

laurentlaurent replied on January 5th, 2012

Sorry just an another question, when I strum up does I have to strum all the string ? because I strum only the one two an third strings.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on January 5th, 2012

Brushing up on the 1s, 2nd, 3rd strings is good ... you don't have to hit all 6 strings on the up stroke.

aluchialuchi replied on December 27th, 2011

Hi Hawkeye, thanks for responding. How we know what time you are live on a chat? Just to say hello sometimes. Thanks again Aluchi

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on December 27th, 2011

Hi, Al. Because I'm frequently on tour I'm almost never on 'live chat' here at JamPlay.com. If I am ever to be on 'live chat' the time/date will be announced/posted on the JamPlay.com home page. I may have time to do so in 2012 ... so check the main page for such information in the future. Thanks again for enjoying these lessons.

aluchialuchi replied on December 26th, 2011

Hawkeye, Seriously you are a wonderful and a motivating teacher. Had I had you long time ago, I would have been a celebrity by now. Unfortunately, I had few not so good teachers and I was discouraged. I came back to guitar two years ago, and you are a my favourite teacher so far. I am enjoying "Good morning blues" song. Thanks again for your time, knowledge, and great teaching skill.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on December 26th, 2011

Thanks so much for the message and kind comments, Al. Very much appreciated. I've given a lot of thought and planning as to the order and content of this lesson series. IF you patiently follow my lessons in the exact order they are presented, progressing from one lesson to the next in your own time/at your own speed/ability, not rushing, you will gain a strong foundation and understanding of blues music and blues guitar that I hope/believe will have you freely playing blues music 'on your own'/creatively for the rest of your life. Please be sure to watch some of my music videos so that you can see how I use the information/techniques that I teach in these lessons when I'm performing at festivals and in concert, and try to play along with me: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=HawkeyeH&view=videos ... Again, thanks for taking the time to let me know that you're enjoying these lessons and the positive progress you've made as a result of 'traveling' with me on the 'blues highway' here at JamPlay.com.

aluchialuchi replied on December 26th, 2011

Hawkeye, Seriously you are a wonderful and a motivating teacher. Had I had you long time ago, I would have been a celebrity by now. Unfortunately, I had few not so good teachers and I was discouraged. I came back to guitar two years ago, and you are a my favourite teacher so far. I am enjoying "Good morning blues" song. Thanks again for your time, knowledge, and great teaching skill.

aluchialuchi replied on December 26th, 2011

Hawkeye, Seriously you are a wonderful and a motivating teacher. Had I had you long time ago, I would have been a celebrity by now. Unfortunately, I had few not so good teachers and I was discouraged. I came back to guitar two years ago, and you are a my favourite teacher so far. I am enjoying "Good morning blues" song. Thanks again for your time, knowledge, and great teaching skill.

aluchialuchi replied on December 26th, 2011

Hawkeye, Seriously you are a wonderful and a motivating teacher. Had I had you long time ago, I would have been a celebrity by now. Unfortunately, I had few not so good teachers and I was discouraged. I came back to guitar two years ago, and you are a my favourite teacher so far. I am enjoying "Good morning blues" song. Thanks again for your time, knowledge, and great teaching skill.

hemantsachdevhemantsachdev replied on December 7th, 2011

I am hooked.....It is after midnight, I am sitting in my hotel room (I travel a lot for work and carry my guitar with me when I am on the road) and going through your lessons and playing along...rather softly. Thank you Mr. Herman (By the way, that is what everybody calls me that can't pronounce my first name properly...hahaha)

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on December 7th, 2011

Hemant, Thanks ... I appreciate your kind words and I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Yes, you can tell I love teaching/playing blues guitar ... I can't help but smile when I'm doing what I love/enjoy. ;-)

apodestaapodesta replied on August 27th, 2011

Hi Hawkeye, I started your lesson series early this year, but got sick and had to stop. It's great to start over again now. It amazed me how quickly you have got us all into the rythm and playing some blues songs. It's great. I've also started to look into the history of the blues; I think you have some history on your website - not sure. Anyway thanks for being a good/enthusiastic teacher. Anthony from the U.K.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on August 27th, 2011

Welcome back, Anthony. Thanks for the kind comments about these lessons. Yes, there are some interesting articles I've written about blues history, as well as about the many great iconic blues figures I met and learned from here: http://hawkeyeherman.com/articles.htm ... Did you know that there is a very useful 'articles' area here at JamPlay.com? Please look here: http://www.jamplay.com/members/articles ... and more specifically: http://www.jamplay.com/members/articles/index.html?cat_id=4 ... http://www.jamplay.com/members/articles/index.html?cat_id=3 ... http://www.jamplay.com/members/articles/view-article.html?id=2 ... I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. ;-)

downunderdownunder replied on May 17th, 2011

Hawkeye, I've just come from Steve Eulberg basic guitar and I'm so excited to be able to play some blues. Beginning to understand the circle of 5ths now. You're a wonderful teacher...I now know the secret to the blues is in the rhythm. TV and housework have gone out the window all I want to do is practise! I can't get enough...thank you (Cher Australia)

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on August 5th, 2011

HI Cher. Thanks so much for the kind message. Take your time and enjoy the learing/practicing/playing process. Don't rush ... this is not a 'race to a finish line' ... playing the guitar is a Life journey that is to be savored and enjoyed ... forever. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. ;-)

flapiraflapira replied on July 31st, 2011

Hi Hawkeye, I'd like to echo the words of my countryman... sorry woman. I really enjoy your style of teaching it really is engaging. So thank you. However, unlike "Cher" I live in France and have been here for 12 months after living in SF for 2 years. Love SF and really miss it. Now I notice that you will be running a workshop in France in November 2011. I hope I can find the time to be there... I'll certainly make an effort. All the best Frank

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on August 5th, 2011

Hi Frank. Thanks so much for your kind message. Very much appreciated. I lived in the SF Bay Area for over 32 years. I now live in peaceful/bucloic mountains of Southern Oregon ... I miss the variety of restaurants in the Bay Area and old friends ... but not much else. Too many people tryin to live in one place for me. ;-) I need peace and quiet when I'm not on tour. I gave a 2-day workshop in Mantes la Jolie, France for the last four years ... but I will not be at the Blues sur Seine Festival (http://www.blues-sur-seine.com) this year (November/2011), I'm sorry to say. Perhaps I'll be back at the event in 2012. I hope so. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on May 17th, 2011

Hi Cher, Thanks so mucgh for your kind comments and for enjoying my lessons. I've given a lot of thought and planning intot he content and order of these lessons ... follow them in the order they are presented, take your time, don't rush, be patient with yourself and progress at your own speed and enjoy the process of learning and practicing ... and you'll gain a strong foundation and understaning of blues music ... and you'll eventaully be able to play blues guitar feely, and even improvise. I hope to come to Australia to teach and perform in the future ... we have a number of Aussie students here at JamPlay.com ... and I tell them all to look on the INternet for blues festivals in your area of 'Oz-land' ... and send the producers of the blues festivals emails requesting that they book me to come 'down under.' I would love to visit your lovely corner of the planet. Thanks again for your kind comments and for enjoying these lessons.

ontheroad517ontheroad517 replied on March 21st, 2011

HI Hawkeye! I have a question regarding I got my mojo working: how do you count the beats on the boom-chika strumming? With the up-down strumming I say one-and-two-and etc. but I get lost after a couple of bars when I separate the bass before doing the up-down... I don't know if it makes any sense? Thank you for these wonderful lessons, I finished phase 1 recently and now I'm really enjoying phase 2! -O

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on March 21st, 2011

Bonjour, mon ami. Thanks so much for enjoying these lessons and for your question. A boom-chick-ah rhythm would be counted: One-and-dah, Two-and-dah, etc. I noticed that you enjoy klezmer music ... I have performed played in all kinds of bands, including a klezmer band, and the rhythm that is used consistently in klezmer band is call "2 -beat' ... the rhythm is boom-chick, boom-chick ... or would be counted; one-and, two, and, etc. Similar to what we're doing with the "Got My Mojo Workin'" song ... instead of playing boom-chick-ah (one-and-dah), in klezmer music you play boom-chick, boom-chick, or one-and, two and. I hope this answers your question and that you continue to enjoy these lessons. Un grand merci for being here at JamPlay and enjoying these lessons.

ontheroad517ontheroad517 replied on March 22nd, 2011

Merci Hawkeye! Thank you for you comment on klezmer, i'm definitely going to try this and see how it works. Maybe someday jamplay could have a klezmer track or a few songs in phase 3? à bientôt!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on March 22nd, 2011

It's my pleasure to 'clarify' the counting of such rhythms for you. As one who was trained early in the 'tropes' of the Hebraic music, I can tell you that the minor modes of such musics are very similar to the minor modes of blues music ... which is one of the reasons why I was attracted to blues music at a very early age. Perhaps there might be some klezmer oriented music in the JamPlay.com Phase Three area ... someday. ;-) Again, thanks so much for enjoying these lessons.

ontheroad517ontheroad517 replied on March 23rd, 2011

I'm going to have to pay more attention next time I go to temple because I've never thought about the similarity between cantillation & blues before ^^

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on March 23rd, 2011

Do you know that I teach a two-day workshop in France, in Mantes la Jolie, for the past 4 our of 5 years, for the Blues sur Seine Festival. Look at the web site: www.blues-sur-seine.com ... and when you get a chance, send them a message asking if I'll be back to Mantes in November of 2011 to teach and perform and if so, ask for information about my 2-day workshop. ;-)

ontheroad517ontheroad517 replied on March 25th, 2011

Yes I've read that you went to the festival, however I didn't know you taught a seminar there. I grew up 10 miles away from Mantes la jolie, so talk about a small small world. Is the seminar for advanced players or beginners can also enjoy the class?

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on March 25th, 2011

THe seminar is two-days long and is for musicians and teachers and covers blues history and some guitar. I have done this for 4 out of the last 5 years. Not sure about this year in November of 2011 ... if you're in interested, contact the event through the link for information. I gave a concert at the lovely old church of St. Martin La Garenne this past November, as well, for the festival. I hope I'm invited back for this November.

ontheroad517ontheroad517 replied on April 11th, 2011

Hi! I heard back from the festival, & it turns out they won't be having the seminar this year. That's too bad because it sounded like a really cool event. Let me know next time there's another event in Paris area. Meanwhile thanks to your great videos, I play my guitar every day!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on April 11th, 2011

Thanks for the message. I'm sorry to hear that the Blues sur Seine Festival will not be having the seminar in November of 2011 ... you found out from them before I did!!!! ... Oh well, I'll let you know if/when I'll be in France in the future. So glad you're playing the guitar regularly ... that's the way to progress, by playing as much as possible. Thanks again for the message and for enjoying these lessons.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on March 23rd, 2011

Yes, you should pay attention to Judaic cantorial music and it's relationship to blues. Klezmer music is "Jewish Jazz" because the players have historically improvised after 'stating' the main musical theme. This aspect/influence along with the minor key(s) the music is frequently played in are a couple of reasons why, years ago, there were many Jews who became Jazz musicians in the USA; Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Stan Getz, Lee Konitz, Ziggy Elman, Buddy Rich, etc. Improvisation is, to me, one of the most appealing aspects of vocal cantorial music, klezmer music, and blues and jazz. Check this out: http://www.bje.org.au/learning/people/famous/jazz.html

ontheroad517ontheroad517 replied on March 25th, 2011

Great thanks for the link :)

ray_ukray_uk replied on February 16th, 2011

Hi Hawkeye, I'm just starting this lesson & haven't played it yet. I like to view the videos a couple of times first & then look at the TAB. In the Supplemental Material the 3rd TAB is for Boom-Chuck Style as it is played when you first introduce it - I notice that for the E chord the B (2nd fret A string) is not played. It looks as if you do fret it in the video though, could you clarify this for me please? I am really enjoying your lessons by the way, look forward to my practice session every day now - thank you. Ray

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on February 16th, 2011

Thanks for the kind words about these lessons. Much appreciated. I sometimes play a first position E chord with the 5th string/A string open ... this is actually one version of an E7 chord. It sounds good to me .... so I use it frequently, even when playing a barred E chord ... technically, this creates a 7th chord. SOrry for the confusion ... I hope this answers your question and that you continue to enjoy these lessons. Thanks again.

ray_ukray_uk replied on February 17th, 2011

Thanks Hawkeye, I didn't know that variation of a 7 chord, all is clear now. I'm lucky, I've got something extra from your lesson and having spoken to you about it I'm betting I won't forget that position! Thanks again, Ray

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on February 17th, 2011

You're most welcome, Ray. Glad you got a 'bonus' from this lesson. :-) I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Thanks so much for traveling with me on the 'blues highway' here at JamPlay.com

thomas raimondothomas raimondo replied on December 31st, 2010

I should not have taken this lesson. The material is over my head. However, I am still interested in taking it, when my level of playing & knowledge improve. Thomas Raimondo

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

I can see you deal with alot of flat pickers but some famouse electric blues artist use a flat pick or both.Buddy guy uses both i do beleive and robert cray . Bobbyrush finger picks alot without any pick if i'm not mistaken.Me if i could just pick with my fingers i'd be happy.Oh well your probably saying to yourself man this guy talks your head off. I just have so many questions and things that i know about that i see . But anyhow my thumb pick is no good.I can go to the regular music store Mike's in Cincinnati Ohio my city were Mr. Sonny Moorman is well known. and get the one you suggest or maybe, just maybe i might find one @musician's friend.com I have an account with them.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on December 20th, 2010

http://www.elderly.com/accessories/items/PK3.htm

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

No it's not like the one your talking about.It's a pawn shop plastic cheapy and it isn't worth a darn.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on December 20th, 2010

If it's plastic ... it's what I'm talking about ... regardless of where you bought it. ;-)

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

I NEED TO GET SET UP SO I CAN COME BACK TO THESE ANY TIME I WANT

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

OF COURSE I AM A BLUES FINATIC BUT YOUR RIGHT BECAUSE JOHNNY CASH WAS A MAIN EXAMPLE FOR THE BOOM CHIKA BOOM CHIKA BOOM CHIKA EXACTLY , AS A MATTER A FACT IBELEIVE JOHNNY CASH WAS MORE ON THAT THAN MOST COUNTRY WESTERN ARTISTS IN THE 1960'S .

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

HE HAD ALREADY BEEN PLAYING FOR YEARS LIKE ME BY EAR BUT I GAVE UP 2 OR 3 YRS AT A TIME. HE DIDN'T , HE KEPT PLAYING AND THEN HE ACTUALLY LEARNED TABLETURE AND HE TOLD ME THAT IF I LEARN TAB IT WILL MAKE MY PLAYING A WHOLE LOT EASIER AND NOW THAT IS WHAT I WANNA DO SO HERE I AM.

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

MY COUSIN LARRY LATER ON LEARNED TAB SCALES I MEAN ACTUALLY WHAT THEY ARE AND WHAT ALL THE CHORDS ARE AFTER HE STARTED THE BACK ROOM BOYS COUNTRY MUSIC BAND IN THE 1980'S , THEY WENT TO NASHVILLE AND I BELEIVE IF I'M NOT MISTAKEN THEY MET UP WITH THE KENTUCKY HEAD HUNTERS.

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

YOUR SHOWING ME ALOT A GOOD STUFF HERE MANE. BECAUSE OF COURSE EVERY BODY THAT HAS PLAYED AROUND ON A GUITAR AROUND THE LATE 1960'S AS I WAS 5 YRS OLD MY GRANDFATHER AND NY COUSIN WHO PLAYED IN A COUNTRY MUSIC BAND IN THE 1980'S LARRY RILEY SHOWED ME HOW TO PLAY FOLSON PRISON BLUES BY JOHNNY CASH FLAT PICK BUT I NEVER GOT AWAY FROM THE FLAT PICK. HE DID HE WENT TO FINGER PICKIN AND THUMB PICK BECAUSE HE STARTED TEACHING HIMSELF THE BANJO BY EAR AND HAD IT DOWN IN NO TIME. BUT THAT WAS BEFORE HE STARTED HIS COUMTRY MUSIC BAND HE WENT TO ELECTRIC BASS, AND IN THE 90'S HE STARTED PLAYING ELECTRIC BLUES,ROCK AND FUNK INTO THE 2000'S AND PASSED AWAY IN 2002. MY COUSIN DID. MY GRANDPA NEVER PLAYED ANYTHING BUT COUNTRY AND FOLK STYLE BLUES BUT LIKE I SED WHEN I WAS 5 YRS OLD I THOUGHT FOLK STYLE BLUES WAS COUNTRY .

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

See i got my mojo workin i always played the way your said we don't wanna do very fast strumming more less but with me it has alot to do with the way i pick with this flat pick.

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

Ok yes you are right because johnny cash I'm going to jackson and there was several songs johnny cash played the actual boom chika boom chika exactly.

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

That pause and think when going to the next chord yes that is a no no and i have a couple of songs i recorded of me with that in them my own songs that is, they're not real bad but it's in there.Unfortunately i didn't erase those 2 and go back and re do them like i did several others.Thinking about the next chord while playing the one were on is important.That's what i try to always do even though i have been playing by ear .But the boom chuk style my fingers i must tell you i have alot of problem with that.I have a thumb pick here but i must be honest with you i am no good at all with.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on December 19th, 2010

It's called 'visualization' ... and whether one plays by ear or not, is crucial to smoothly changing chords and not dropping the rhythm. You many have a thumbpick ... but if it's not a Herco Blue Nylon thumbpick ... but a plastic clunky one, like most are, you're going to have trouble getting used to it. I refer you, again, to my post on "Thumbpick vs Flat Pick" here in the forum posts at JamPlay.com. By the way ... There are two words I don't use in my vocabulary ... 'can't' ... and ... 'never.' :-) Enjoy the blues journey.

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

See datz were my problems come in i can only use a flat pick and i never was able to pick with my fingers.I still try though .

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

THEY'RE BEAUTIFUL GUITARS AND EXPENSIVE.

greenboogiegreenboogie replied on December 19th, 2010

I do that alot with a flat pick.

strat9strat9 replied on October 25th, 2010

Visualization really helps with changing chords. nevr thought of doing it. Now, I always do it!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on October 26th, 2010

Visualization is a necesscity in order to smoothly accomplish all physcial activities ... be it playing the guitar, all sports, dancing, writing, painitng/sculpting/arts ... you must look 'up the road' to where you'r going, not focus on where you are or where you've been. I'm glad this lesson has been a help to you. Thanks so much.

deathmaniacdeathmaniac replied on July 10th, 2010

hawkeman you rock and rock the world man I want rock and roll come on baby I wanna rock this world this palce rocks I wanna rock in this valley yeah i stay in Canada babe I rock

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on July 10th, 2010

Thanks for the message/comments. Follow this lessons series in the order presented and you'll be 'rockin' for the rest of your life ;-)

nkraftnkraft replied on January 29th, 2010

Great less on fundamentals. I started guitar with rock and some blues many years ago. It was the blues, though, that inspired me to pick up the guitar again years later. Your lessons and website, Hawkeye, are exactly what I was looking for, and worth the price of JamPlay in an of themselves. Your enthusiasm for the blues is infectious - and I'm infected. I look forward to spending more time with you on the next 50 or so lessons.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on January 31st, 2010

Thanks so much for your comments and kind words. Very much appreciated. There are many more hours of my lessons 'in the can' waiting to be posted ... beyond what is currently available. I hope you'll continue to enjoy traveling with me on the 'blues highway' here at jamplay.com. I have much, much more to share with you, It's most gratifying to hear that I'm the impetus for your being here ... if you have friends interested in learning to play the guitar ... please spread the word about my lessons and jamplay.com ... I want everyone to learn how to play and enjoy the blues. Again, thanks so much. :-)

zayatszayats replied on December 3rd, 2009

Wow - am I fortunate to have met Herman !! Now all I do is sing the blues all day !!! Love these lessons!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on December 4th, 2009

Thanks for the message, Rodger, and for enjoying these lessons. Please be sure to watch some of my performance videos at: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=HawkeyeH&view=videos so you cans see how I use the information I teach here at JamPlay.com when I'm performing at festivals and in concert. thans again.

rockingchicagorockingchicago replied on October 26th, 2009

thank you hawkeye every lesson i watch i know alot more about the blues...

prdonnellyprdonnelly replied on October 1st, 2009

Hawkeye, Having a real tough time palm muting - one clarification I am trying to use a standard pick - do youe expect that if I got the thumb pick I might have an easier time with the muting - as my strumming hand would not move so much ?? either way any tips........I cannot stop the b and high e from ringing and it sounds like junk. other than that great lessons.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on October 1st, 2009

PAt, Thaks for enjoying these lessons. Yes you can use a flatpick if you want. I've gotten lots of questions about this, and posted an explanation here: http://www.jamplay.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4476 MUting the high E and B strings, nad muting in general, is done with the heel of your palm; if your picking with your right hand, that would be the bottom fleshy edge of your palm, diagonally opposite/across from your thumb ... whether using a flatpick or a thumbpick ... also, lighten up on your stroke/strumming the strings. I hope this helps. Let me know. Practice, you'll get it. :-)

finalfinal replied on July 24th, 2009

Hey Hawkeye! Thanks for these fine lessons, it realy helps me and it also make the guitar practecing mutch more fun this way. I do have one question for you, im new to this so pleas beare with me.: The 12 bars blues with cords like this E-E-E-E7-A-A-E-E-H7-A-E-E. Is this the only way to play it or can you mix the cords order any way you like it feks E-E7-A-A-A-E-E-E-H7-A-E-E.Tanks for now and keep up the good work on this site. sorry aboud my bad inglish.

sendbahtsendbaht replied on August 18th, 2009

Hawkeye, I'm having a ball..thanks!!!!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on August 18th, 2009

Don, So good to have you here with us at jamplay.com. I'm pleased to hear you're enjoying these lessons and the 'new' sounds that you're creating on the guitar. Follow the order of the lessons as they are presented ... try not to skip around, and you'll gain a strong foundation and understanding of the music and how to play it and even create music on your own. It's most encouraging for me to know that the blues and my lessons have spread to Thailand. Thanks for 'having a ball."

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on July 24th, 2009

final, Thanks for the message and for enjoying these lessons. There ARE variations in 12-bar blues, but you can't just mix up the chords any way you want (unless you're attempting to create your own original blues type song that is 12 bars long and has a meoldy that fits your 'new' chord changes.) In the key of E you can play (each letter equals one measure/4beats); EEEEAAEEBAEE, or you can play EAEEAAEEBAE, or you might play EEEEAAEEBBEE, or EAEEAAEEBBEE ... and that's about it for the variations in 12-bar blues. The chords used in these variations depend on what the melody is that is being sung. You can learn more here: http://hawkeyeherman.com/media/guitar-lesson01.mp3 I hope this answers your question. Thanks again.

slimjimslimjim replied on June 18th, 2009

Thanks for the great lessons Hawkeye. JamPlay is really helping me. I picked up my guitar in January after 7 years and have started over. I am working furiously to get through a 4 day workshop with Ken Hamm next month - I practice any chance I can get. Wish me luck.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on June 18th, 2009

slimjim, Thanks for wnjying my lessons. Very much appreciated. Well, take your time ... you have the rest of your life to learn about playing blues guitar ... Ken Hamm isn't going to 'test' you and throw you out if you can't do what he teaches you in five seconds ... you're going to be with him to learn ... not to show him and the rest of the students how much you already know ... please exhale and go to his class/workshop without having something to prove to him and the rest of the class ... you're there to learn ... the 'pressure' is on you to be open-minded and gain knowledge ... in your brain ... so that you can spend the rest of your life perfecting on the guitar what you learn from Ken ... your level of ability should have nothing to do with your attitude in the classroom. This is not a competition ... this is a learning experience ... go there to learn ... not to show what you already know ... and you'll learn a lot more than if you're concerned constantly about 'being good or better' than the rest of the students. This is an art form ... not a competition ... enjoy the learning process ... and take the pressure off yourself, please ... and you'll get more than your money's worth from Ken's workshop. I hope you understand what I'm trying to get across to you ... enjoy the process. ;-)

slimjimslimjim replied on June 22nd, 2009

Thanks Hawkeye. I appreciate what you're saying.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on June 23rd, 2009

slimjim, I'm glad you accept the comments I've offered in the open and nurturing spirit in which I've given them. Go to Ken's workshop to learn ... with a clear and open mind ... if you get hung up trying to show Ken and the rest of the class how much you already know ... and if think competitively ... you will not have a clear mind that is open to learning ... believe me, I know ... I've taught hundreds of guitar workshops .. and witnessed this mindset many times ... exhale/breathe, go to learn with an open mind ... don't worry about the skills of others ... learn as much as you can from this experience ... where you are on the path of playing blues guitar RELATIVE TO OTHERS is of absolutely no consequence ... try to enjoy the learning process for your own sake and peace of mind. Thanks for listening. Have fun. Please give my regards to Ken.

andrewg002andrewg002 replied on May 15th, 2009

Hey Hawkeye!....Fantastic lessons...Ive been playing for a few years now, self taught, but due to this fact i am missing some of the basic fun-damentals of playing the guitar which has hindered me greatly in terms of progression. I found jamplay and hoped by taking 2 steps backward it would help me progress that extra step im looking for. It has....and your tuition in these basic first steps is simple and easy to understand. I enjoy your teaching style and will stick with the programme as blues is fun, simple, it sounds fantastic and is relatively easy in the early stages....My problem was however I have a tendancy to jump ahead of myself which, see how hard it gets, it overloads my poor little brain and it becomes too daunting to continue. No more!! :) I do have 1 question for you, when dampening the strings with the heel of my hand I have a problem with not being able to cover all the strings, due to this the top or bottom E still rings not becoming dampened like the rest.....any tips to stop this? Thanks or your help....

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on May 15th, 2009

andrewg002, Thanks so much for your comments and for enjoying these lessons. Please do stick with the order of the lessons presented ... I have given a lot of thought and planning as to the order and content of each of these lessons ... so as to help you build a strong foundation in blues music ... and if you skip around you'll still learn a lot, but there will be 'holes'/gaps in your blues foundation/understanding. Try to change the angle of your damping hand just a bit and see if that helps your damping all the strings ... this is a trial and error process that is different for every player, due to the fact we all have different hand/palm sizes ... and so many different guitars. Also, you can dampen strings by releasing the pressure of your fingers on the frets. Experiment, and see if any of these suggestions help. Hope so. Thanks again for enjoying these lessons.

retcpo99retcpo99 replied on April 16th, 2009

Thanks so much for your great instruction. Your teaching style allows for an ease of learning for this 50 year old beginner. Thanks again and look forward to more lessons.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on April 16th, 2009

retcpo99, Thanks so much, Glad you're enjoying these lessons. There's much more to come. I hope you'll continue to learn and enjoy playing blues guitar.

rangelyderekrangelyderek replied on April 3rd, 2009

Man, lessons superb!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on April 3rd, 2009

Thanks so much. Stick around ... there's much more. :-) Cheers, Hawkeye

whitebomberwhitebomber replied on February 21st, 2009

Awesome, just the only way to say it! The recap of the various patterns is great. And the extended comments about visualization is very cool. You had mentioned it in a previous video but I kinda forgot about it, now hopefully it has sunk in. BTW I ordered and received the blue thumb picks, and I like the feel. My previous experience was with a much stiffer thumb pick and I really didn't like the feel. This one also seems to stay put better then other ones I tried. Thanks again, and on to lesson 4!

mrousemrouse replied on March 29th, 2009

Very much enjoyin the lessons Hawkeye ..on thing..I wish I had a little more detail nonthe strum in chapter 3 Scene 2- on exactly how you strum down on the down down up deal and a really slow 1-2-3-4 count where I could see your strumming fingers...I'm and old dog learning somw new tricks..and I'm liking your work...also wondering if I could get a DVD of your beginning blues series as I will take months to get through this...Many thanks...Love and Peace Michael

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on March 29th, 2009

=== mrouse, Thanks so much. I'm happy to hear you're enjoying these lessons ... as much as I enjoy presenting them. Very much appreciated. As far as your question about the strum technique in this lesson ... "a picture is worth a thousand words" ... ;-) ... the advantage of these video lessons is just that ... please use the stop/pause/rev/fwrd 'controls' to review small bits of the video repeated times ... to study what I'm doing closely ... with your guitar in your lap ... and listen to my verbal explanation(s) repeated times ... try to play along ... be patient with yourself ... so what if you have to watch/repeat something hundreds of times until you 'get it' ... I cannot transcribe into text what is already done so well using three video cameras. This is all about repetition, so take advantage of the video 'controls' and you can get me to repeat anything, verbally or on the guitar, a million times ... until you get it ;-) Thanks for asking, but I'm sorry to say that I don't have an instructional DVD ... but there is a Hawkeye Live DVD which many students here at jamplay.com have purchased so as to see how I use the blues techniques I teach here when I'm performing in concert and at blues festivals ... and they/you can play along and 'lift' more blues guitar riffs. You can preview many of the songs on the Hawkeye Live DVD here http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=HawkeyeH and if you decide to purchase the DVD, you can do so here http://www.hawkeyeherman.com/blues_shop.htm along with my three CDs. Again, thanks so much for your kind message. I hope you continue to travel with me here on the 'blues highway' at jamplay.com

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on February 21st, 2009

whitebomber, Thanks for your comments. This is just the beginning for you ... you'll be amazed at what you can accomplish in a short period of time if you stick with this 'program' ... and practice. Glad you like the blues nylon Herco thumbpick. If it's too tight, you can open it up a little bit, if it's too loose, you can squeeze the loop together a bit for a tighter fit. Always comfortable and lightweight. Plastic thumbpicks are terrible. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Thanks again.

whitebomberwhitebomber replied on February 23rd, 2009

Hawkeye, thanks for the speedy reply. Quick question, when you are doing the boom chicka, are you using the thumbpick for the chicka portion or your fingers? Like in the Mojo song. I've tried using the thumbpick and have a hard time just glancing over the strings, so just wondered? Thanks!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on February 24th, 2009

whitebomber, I'm using my thumbpick only ... no my fingers. Pretend your thumbpick is a flatpick ... and tuck you index finger along the side of the thumbpick, they way you would if you were holding a flatpick. That's why I love a nylon thumbpick (not thick klunky plastic), because you can grasp it like a flatpick, or not. Play slow ... build up speed ... slowly. Keep practicing.

stratocristerstratocrister replied on January 24th, 2009

Wow , Herman. I love you videos , seriously , could there be a better teacher. You are so perfect for me. You take it in a slow and nice tempo and before I knew it I could play blues. THANKS MATE!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on January 24th, 2009

stratocrister, Thanks so much. Welcome to traveling with me on the blues highway. I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Don't skip around, please ... stick with the program. You can get more guitar lessons from me for free here: http://hawkeyeherman.com/guitar-lessons.htm and you watch me perform here: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=HawkeyeH I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons ... there's much more to come. (BTW, my last name is Herman :-)

gerrygerry replied on January 11th, 2009

I Like that kind of teaching, cool positive lessons, i just linger to be here, despite im a beginner at phase one, i just like to sneak around, lol...thanks Hawkeye !

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on January 11th, 2009

gerry, Thanks for the comments. That's how I roll ... cool and easy. I hope you'll join me here on 'the blues highway' guitar lessons when you get past Phase One. Thanks again

hectorioushectorious replied on December 27th, 2008

I gotta say, I was ready to let my JamPlay subscription expire, not because I didn't like the instruction, but because it wasn't much fun. Hawkeye, you have put the fun back in. I'll be keeping my subscription active.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on December 28th, 2008

hectorious, Thanks for the kind comment. WHere you been hiding, man ... I've been here with the blues at jamplay.com for many months ... so glad you finally found my 'blues highway' ... take your time with these lessons, we ain't goin' nowhere that ain't fun ... enjoy the process and the music ... I love sharing the blues with y'all, and I appreciate your renewing your jamplay.com 'subscription' ... now, on with my prescription for your (previous) lack of fun while learning to play the guitar. Stick with me and you'll be able to play the blues as you feel them ... and have some fun along the way. Thanks again.

laurenblaurenb replied on November 10th, 2008

I'm enjoying these lessons so much. They're manageable for a beginner and Hawkeye is so easy to understand and follow. They're also paced really well and I feel like I'm making steady progress which helps keep my motivation up. Thanks so much for doing the blues series, I'm gonna keep working right through them all. Awesome!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on November 10th, 2008

laurenb, Thanks so much for your kind comments. Thanks to you for the kind comment. Take your time with these lessons. You'll be surprised how fast you'll learn if you don't skip around and follow the lessons in order ... try not to move ahead until you understand and can accomplish what is being taught in a given lesson. Enjoy the process and don't pressure yourself to move fast or play fast. There's no rush. I want you to have a strong foundation in the basics of blues ... that you'll be able to build on for the rest of your life. Also, I see that you're a teacher ... cool!!! ... please check out the "Blues In The Schools" page at my web site: www.HawkeyeHreman.com ... be sure to listen/watch the sound bytes at the top of the page ... I've presented my Blues In The Schools program in over 500 schools, in 22 states and 5 countries ... to over 1/2 million students of all ages. I'm off to France(11/11 to12-6) to perform at the Blues sur Seine near Paris, in concert each night for two weeks, and in French schools during the day ... and I'll also be presenting a 2-day seminar retreat for French musicians and teachers interested in creating an in-school blues education curriculum according to their skills and background. Did you know that you can get a free guitar by attending a teachers guitar camp for a week in the summer ... and you can get a grant to pay for the teacher's guitar camp, as well. Five elem. teachers in N. Colorado are now using their free guitar and the skills they learned at the camp as a result of my informing them about this opportunity. Please do check it out: http://www.guitaredunet.org I hope you continue to enjoy these lessons. Please do keep me advised as to your progress.

liamheffernanliamheffernan replied on November 5th, 2008

Great lesson..very helpfull...I laughed when i heard mojo working..its so cool

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on November 5th, 2008

liamheffernan, Thanks for the comment and for enjoying the lesson. Much appreciated. I can't guarantee you'll get a laugh out of every lesson, but I do guarantee you'll learn a lot about blues music if you hang in there with me and follow the lessons in the order they are presented. Thanks again!

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on July 27th, 2008

There's a "Hawkeye Live in Concert" DVD you might enjoy ... You can see/hear many of the songs on the DVD for free on youtube.com at; http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=HawkeyeH Check 'em out ... you can see/hear my blues ... in action.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on July 18th, 2008

jackie123, Thanks so much for the kind message. Stories like yours are what makes teaching/sharing my love for blues/music with others so gratifying and rewarding. As one door closes in your life, another opens ... and I am most pleased to have had a part in the positive process of ... your life. Many more of my blues guitar lessons will be posted here in the weeks/months to come. I hope you find as much information and encouragement via the future lessons as you have realized via the lessons already posted. Enjoy your retirement ... and new found life path(s) ... via the blues. Again, thanks so much for taking the time to share your story with us.

jackie134jackie134 replied on July 14th, 2008

Hi Hawkeye I just had to let you know.......... I retired from fulltime work from a qualifications awarding body in London UK on Friday and my colleagues gave me a great send off with presents and speeches from my director and line manager etc in our staff restaurant. Rather than give a formal response I sang "Farewell Awarding Body Rubric Blues" It was fantastic and at the end there was a standing ovation!!!!! I could do this because of the confidence your lessons gave me. I was able to write a song that was relevant to my colleagues as well as conveying my enthusiasm, love and frustrations of working for such a super organsation. I had worked there for 21years and 5 years with a six year gap when my children were tiny. So after a long worthwhile career I went out with a WOW! strumming and singing a 12 bars blues!!!! Thanks so much Hawkeye! Your lessons could not have come at a better time for me ...... I have set a new precedent for leaving!!!!!! I am waiting now for some more lessons to add the elaborations. The first verse was: Farewell colleagues, you aint going to see me no more! X2 After 21 years and 5, I'm walking out the door! Thanks again Jackie

cderowcderow replied on July 12th, 2008

more! more! more!

celandceland replied on July 10th, 2008

Love this lesson series - really appreciate it Hawkeye

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on July 10th, 2008

Thanks for the kind comments. Very much appreciated. Jamplay.com will be posting many more of my blues guitar lessons, so hang in there. I've been playing guitar for 50 years ... and a pro for 40+ years ... and teaching all along the way ... most of my guitar teaching now takes place at blues/folk festivals workshops ... I met and learned directly for Son House, Lightnin' Hopkins, Mance Lipscomb, Bukka White, Furry Lewis, Sam Chatmon, John Jackson, Brownie McGhee, Yank Rachell, etc. ... and it's my goal to communicate what I learned from those blues icons to everyone interested in learning ... clearly and slowly ... so take your time with these lessons ... as we're building on the basics in order to learn understand many blues guitar styles ... and eventually ... how to be/express yourself ... in the blues. Enjoy the journey.

funkitupfunkitup replied on July 10th, 2008

Hawkeye you're my hero! What a legend...

bobbysunbobbysun replied on July 9th, 2008

Hawkeye seems to be a great teacher. He moves right along and is very understandable. He will be a great addition.

Hawkeye.HermanHawkeye.Herman replied on July 9th, 2008

There's plenty more to come. Get the basics under your belt ... practice until you don't have to think about the next chord ... or have to count ... get the chord changes from your head ... into your gut and fingers ... practice over and over again, and enjoy the process ... you should be able to feel where the changes are ... without counting ... in every key ... and get this stuff down pat ... because we're going to learn some fingerpicking ... and Robert Johnson material in the lessons ahead ... as well as slide guitar. Take it slow ... crawl before you walk, walk before you run. Many blues songs are ... very sloooow ... remember, you don't have to play fast to get a groove going. Visualize the next chord before playing it ... and you'll be less likely to drop the time ... if there's not a solid tempo ... slow, medium, or fast ... it ain't blues. Be sure to check out the free 'guitar lessons' on my web site; www.HawkeyeHerman.com ... and watch the video at: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=HawkeyeH and try to fiugre out what key I play each song in .. and try to play along. Have fun ... it's a long and winding road ... that has no end. Enjoy the journey.

jf3193jf3193 replied on July 8th, 2008

xcellent lesson...........thanks.. keep it up

rarsenrarsen replied on July 8th, 2008

Thanks so much about reminding to visualize ahead, it might be basic but has definitely helped me on chord transitions.

mclend1mclend1 replied on July 8th, 2008

Another great lesson, elemental, but so very useful. *keeps on practising*

mcd_sportsmcd_sports replied on July 7th, 2008

I have always loved the blues even though I am a rocker at heart. These lessons are awesome, easy to follow, and I know will help me as I move forward in whatever genre. Thanks Hawkeye!

evilhedgehogevilhedgehog replied on July 7th, 2008

Excellent job as always! Looking forward to more!

jackie134jackie134 replied on July 7th, 2008

Great lesson! Looking forward to the next. Thanks Hawkeye!

jasguitarjasguitar replied on July 7th, 2008

Learning blues is the reason I started playing the guitar but this is the most fun I've ever had on a lesson, even though its quite basic, Hawkeye lets you see the possibilities, and its great.

ronin808ronin808 replied on July 7th, 2008

Very Good man!!!keep them comin!!

Blues Guitar with Hawkeye

Found in our Beginner Lesson Sets

The blues is a distinctly American style of music. Many popular genres such as jazz, rock, and country music draw upon basic blues concepts. Consequently, it is advantageous for any guitarist to study the blues.



Lesson 1

Introduction to Blues

Hawkeye Herman introduces the blues. He explains the 12 bar blues chords and the poetic format that blues lyrics typically follow.

Length: 19:25 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Lesson 2

Understanding Blues Chords

Hawkeye explains how the I, IV, and V chords are used in a 12 bar blues progression.

Length: 12:12 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Lesson 3

Blues Rhythm

Hawkeye demonstrates common strumming patterns used in blues music. He also explains how country music evolved from the blues.

Length: 19:42 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 4

Intro to the Blues Shuffle

The shuffle is one of the most common rhythms used in blues music. Hawkeye introduces the most basic shuffle rhythm pattern.

Length: 18:12 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 5

More Blues Shuffle

Hawkeye covers the blues shuffle in greater depth.

Length: 13:13 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 6

The Blues Turnaround

Hawkeye introduces and explains a common blues turnaround.

Length: 7:45 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 7

Interesting Blues Turnaround

Hawkeye demonstrates various ways of arpeggiating the blues turnaround from the previous lesson.

Length: 8:08 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 8

Moving the Turnaround

Hawkeye explains how the turnaround from the previous lesson can be transposed to all 12 keys.

Length: 5:57 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 9

Turnaround in the Bass

Hawkeye explains how the blues turnaround can be played on the bass strings.

Length: 11:12 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 10

Turnaround Practice

Hawkeye provides some tips regarding how to integrate turnarounds into the context of the 12 bar blues form.

Length: 3:58 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 11

Turnarounds as Lead

In this lesson Hawkeye will explain how you can use turnarounds as a way to play basic lead.

Length: 0:00 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 12

Subtle Changes

Hawkeye demonstrates how subtle changes made to the blues shuffle can have a profound impact on the overall sound of the 12 bar form.

Length: 7:12 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 13

Blues Shuffle Variations

Hawkeye demonstrates more blues shuffle variations. He discusses playing individual notes and palm muting.

Length: 7:23 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 14

Bass Blues Shuffle

In this lesson, Hawkeye teaches a bass version of the blues shuffle that mimics a common left-hand piano pattern.

Length: 10:49 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 15

Turnaround Exercise

Hawkeye presents an exercise that will enable you to play a turnaround over the blues form in all twelve keys.

Length: 10:44 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 16

Delta Blues Turnaround

Hawkeye teaches a Delta blues turnaround in the key of A. This turnaround is played in the style of Robert Johnson.

Length: 10:45 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 17

Delta Blues Turnaround #2

Hawkeye Herman teaches a new Delta blues turnaround. This lick was inspired by Robert Johnson.

Length: 7:12 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 18

Robert Johnson Style

Hawkeye Herman teaches more components of Robert Johnson's signature sound.

Length: 27:38 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 19

Movable Chords

Hawkeye introduces some common, movable chord shapes.

Length: 17:42 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 20

Movable Chord Review

Hawkeye reviews movable chords in this lesson. He explains how these chord voicings can be used in a practical blues context.

Length: 5:41 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 21

Basic Blues Scale

Hawkeye Herman introduces the minor pentatonic scale in this lesson, the most commonly used scale in blues lead guitar.

Length: 23:54 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 22

Passing Notes

Hawkeye builds on the pentatonic scale. He introduces "blue" notes, which transform the pentatonic scale into the minor blues scale.

Length: 12:50 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 23

Scales and Keys

Hawkeye explains how to transpose the minor pentatonic and minor blues scales to different keys.

Length: 21:18 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 24

Finding the Key

Hawkeye Herman explains how to determine the key of a blues song. This information is essential if you wish to play lead over a song.

Length: 15:31 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 25

Lightnin' Hopkins Style

In this lesson, Hawkeye will bring together much of what he has taught in this lesson series and apply it to the style of Lightnin' Hopkins.

Length: 16:36 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 26

Treble Shuffle

Hawkeye explains how to play the blues shuffle on the treble strings.

Length: 9:22 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 27

The Great River Road

Hawkeye Herman teaches you how to play his original song, "The Great River Road," in this phenomenal lesson.

Length: 16:39 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 28

Mississippi John Hurt Style

Hawkeye covers the guitar style of Mississippi John Hurt. This style makes heavy use of alternating bass lines.

Length: 14:48 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 29

Piano Blues

Hawkeye teaches an original piece called "Piano Blues." He teaches this song to further demonstrate the alternating bass line.

Length: 13:20 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 30

Blues Accompaniment

Hawkeye Herman teaches a beautiful blues accompaniment pattern.

Length: 10:11 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 31

Stop-Time Blues

Hawkeye introduces the stop-time blues rhythm.

Length: 17:21 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 32

Sweet Home Chicago

Hawkeye Herman explains how to play Robert Johnson's "Sweet Home Chicago."

Length: 16:17 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 33

Eight Bar Blues

Hawkeye introduces the eight bar blues progression.

Length: 22:28 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 34

8 Bar Blues Key Transposition

Hawkeye takes the 8 bar blues material from the last lesson and explains how to transpose it to different keys.

Length: 6:39 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 35

Classic 8 Bar Blues

Hawkeye teaches a classic 8 bar blues tune in the style of Brownie McGhee and Big Bill Broonzy.

Length: 25:10 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 36

Playing Multiple Notes

In this lesson Hawkeye revisits the blues/pentatonic scale and talks about playing multiple notes at the same time.

Length: 9:42 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 37

Classic End Tag

Hawkeye Herman teaches a classic blues song ending. He also explains how it can be played in different keys.

Length: 9:42 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 38

Basic Blues Slide

Hawkeye Herman covers the basics of slide technique and provides exercises to demonstrate them.

Length: 25:49 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 39

Slide Guitar and Open D Tuning

Hawkeye Herman introduces open D tuning. He explains how to play a 12 bar blues progression with a slide in this tuning.

Length: 14:56 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 40

Ramblin' On My Mind

Hawkeye Herman demonstrates the classic Robert Johnson song, "Ramblin' On My Mind" in open D tuning.

Length: 8:41 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 41

Blues Shuffle in Open D

Hawkeye explains how to play the blues shuffle in open D tuning.

Length: 0:00 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 42

Open D Harmony Shuffle

Hawkeye teaches the "harmony" version of the shuffle in open D tuning.

Length: 5:15 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 43

Open D Turnaround

Hawkeye teaches a simple blues turnaround in open D tuning.

Length: 9:00 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 44

Open D Slide Licks

Hawkeye Herman teaches some open D slide guitar licks. These licks are inspired by the song "Ramblin' On My Mind" by Robert Johnson.

Length: 8:14 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 45

Pentatonic Scale in Open D

Hawkeye Herman explains how to play the D minor pentatonic scale in Open D tuning.

Length: 4:00 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 46

Ramblin' On My Mind

Hawkeye challenges you to play "Ramblin' On My Mind" using the techniques from the past couple of lessons.

Length: 4:03 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 47

Rock and Slide Guitar

Hawkeye shows that open D tuning and slide guitar are not exclusive to the blues. He provides an exercise that demonstrates how this tuning can be used in rock music.

Length: 15:55 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 48

D Tuning Chords

Hawkeye returns to the world of open D tuning. He introduces various chord voicings and explains how they can be used in the blues.

Length: 10:00 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 49

You Got To Move

In this lesson, Hawkeye teaches a classic blues song by Mississippi Fred McDowell - "You Got To Move".

Length: 9:03 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 50

You Got to Move Melody

Hawkeye Herman demonstrates how to play the melody of "You Got to Move" with a slide.

Length: 6:51 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 51

Slide Guitar and Blues Licks

Hawkeye Herman talks about playing and creating blues licks with the slide.

Length: 9:53 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 52

Elmore James Style

Hawkeye Herman breaks down important aspects of Elmore James' style.

Length: 23:11 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 53

Blues Licks and Riffs

Hawkeye teaches some versatile blues licks and riffs that can be used in open D tuning.

Length: 11:15 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 54

Open G Tuning

Hawkeye Herman teaches the basics of open G tuning.

Length: 7:28 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 55

G Tuning Chords

Hawkeye gives a brief overview of chords and how they are played in open G tuning.

Length: 6:11 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 56

Blues Scale in Open G Tuning

Hawkeye gives a brief rundown of how the blues / minor pentatonic scale can be played in open G tuning.

Length: 4:48 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Lesson 57

G Tuning Accompaniment

Hawkeye talks about playing accompaniment using open G tuning.

Length: 7:44 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 58

Improvising in G Tuning

Improvisation using the minor pentatonic / blues scale is discussed in open G tuning. Hawkeye also touches on Robert Johnson's song, "Walkin' Blues."

Length: 7:26 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 59

Open G Shuffle Rhythm

In this lesson, Hawkeye Herman talks about playing the blues shuffle in open G tuning. He also shows some basic turnarounds.

Length: 10:37 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 60

Open G Shuffle Variations

Hawkeye reviews the blues shuffle in open G tuning. He demonstrates shuffle variations as well as a few licks, turnarounds, and other tidbits.

Length: 15:45 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 61

Robert Johnson Licks

Hawkeye teaches several Robert Johnson licks in this lesson. These licks are played with a slide in open G tuning.

Length: 14:40 Difficulty: 2.5 FREE
Lesson 62

G Tuning and the Capo

Hawkeye introduces the capo and explains how it can be used. This lesson is still in the context of G tuning.

Length: 10:28 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 63

Come On In My Kitchen

Hawkeye Herman showcases the power of slide guitar by demonstrating the classic Robert Johnson song, "Come On In My Kitchen."

Length: 6:33 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 64

Skip James Style

Hawkeye Herman gives a brief rundown of Skip James' blues guitar style. This lesson also focuses on playing in open tunings without a slide.

Length: 19:15 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 65

Open D to Open G

Hawkeye demonstrates how to take a song from open D tuning and play it in open G. He uses the song "No Expectations" by the Rolling Stones as an example.

Length: 10:26 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 66

Drop D Tuning

Hawkeye shows you the wonders of drop D tuning and teaches his rendition of "Big Road Blues."

Length: 30:30 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 67

Statesboro Blues

Hawkeye goes over the fantastic song "Statesboro Blues" by Blind Willie McTell in Drop D tuning.

Length: 27:12 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 68

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Hawkeye discusses some history behind the great blues guitarist Blind Lemon Jefferson. He covers the song "Matchbox Blues" to provide an example of his style.

Length: 19:40 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 69

Minor Blues

Hawkeye explains the chord changes used in a minor blues progression.

Length: 12:53 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 70

The Capo

Hawkeye talks about the capo and its many uses.

Length: 22:32 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 71

Song Endings

By user request, Hawkeye shares ideas on how to end songs in this lesson.

Length: 21:26 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 72

Stop Time Blues

In this lesson, Hawkeye Herman returns to the wonderful world of stop-time blues. He teaches a few more ways to play in this glorious style.

Length: 17:53 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 73

Eight Bar Blues

Hawkeye talks about the eight bar blues and uses some classic blues songs as examples.

Length: 26:19 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 74

Blues Mambo

Hawkeye talks all about the blues mambo in this lesson.

Length: 16:09 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 75

Movable Endings

Hawkeye explains how all the endings you've learned up to this point can be transposed to any key.

Length: 31:53 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 76

Movable Blues Scale

Hawkeye talks about transposing the minor pentatonic scale to various keys.

Length: 16:58 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 77

Blues Scale Lead

Hawkeye explains how the blues scale can be used to play lead in any song.

Length: 30:57 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 78

Spanning the Neck

Hawkeye explains how the blues scale can span the neck in any key.

Length: 22:09 Difficulty: 3.5 Members Only
Lesson 79

The Blues Had a Baby

Hawkeye talks about the background of rock 'n roll and how it is connected to blues.

Length: 21:42 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 80

Fun Licks

This lesson is filled with fun licks and lick techniques.

Length: 17:32 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 81

Spanning the Neck Continued

Hawkeye brings more blues wisdom to you in this lesson about spanning the neck.

Length: 18:18 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 82

Barre Chords Refresher

Hawkeye provides a few useful tips on playing barre chords.

Length: 13:18 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 83

Chord Relationships

Hawkeye discusses how the visual shapes of chords relate to one another on the fretboard.

Length: 15:06 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 84

Chord Relationships Continued

Hawkeye explains how to find the I, IV, and V chords in all 12 major keys.

Length: 8:43 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 85

Shuffle Rhythm Review

Hawkeye answers member questions on the shuffle rhythm.

Length: 16:19 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 86

Key of A Idea

Hawkeye shares an idea in the key of A that you can apply to your blues playing.

Length: 18:15 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 87

Thumbpick Vs. Flatpick

Thumbpick Vs. Flatpick: A most common question asked among guitarists is discussed in this lesson.

Length: 15:13 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 88

Capo Ideas

Hawkeye shares his ideas on the capo and explains why he thinks it is important for every guitarist to own one.

Length: 18:34 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 89

Everything is Movable

Hawkeye reiterates that everything is movable on the guitar and provides some fresh new ideas.

Length: 12:27 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 90

Bass Notes in Treble

Hawkeye explains how to add variety to the shuffle pattern by transferring the bass notes to the treble register and by adding palm muting. He also explains how you can create your own shuffle variations.

Length: 21:21 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 91

Treble Shuffle

Hawkeye provides more amazing tips and tricks on moving your shuffle rhythm to the treble for a unique sound.

Length: 16:50 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 92

Creating Solos

Hawkeye revisits the techniques learned in the last few lessons and explains how to tie tie them together to create solos.

Length: 9:46 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 93

Transposing Songs

Hawkeye provides some great tips for transposing any song you want to learn to a different key.

Length: 17:31 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 94

History of Blues

This exciting lesson dives into some of the earliest history of blues music and how it has shaped popular music today.

Length: 13:52 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 95

Blues is the Roots

Hawkeye Herman explains why "blues is the roots, and everything else is the fruits."

Length: 8:41 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Lesson 96

The Style of Hank Williams

Hawkeye discusses the history and style of Hank Williams.

Length: 17:07 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 97

The Style of Jimmie Rodgers

Hawkeye demonstrates some key aspects of Jimmie Rodgers' style.

Length: 12:30 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 98

Boom-Chicka Strum

Hawkeye demonstrates the "boom-chicka" strum and explains various ways you can incorporate it into your playing.

Length: 22:44 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 99

Fun Runs

Hawkeye Herman explains how to spice up your rhythm playing by incorporating bass runs between chord changes.

Length: 16:20 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 100

Review & Practice

Hawkeye Herman celebrates lesson 100 with a short but sweet review of what you've learned in the past couple of lessons.

Length: 6:51 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 101

Song Medley

Hawkeye Herman demonstrates rhythmic concepts from earlier lessons by playing a fun medley.

Length: 13:08 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 102

Hawkeye's Favorite Licks

Hawkeye shares some of his favorite licks in this lesson.

Length: 22:35 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 103

More Fun Licks

Hawkeye teaches more fun licks to add to your blues bag of tricks.

Length: 31:20 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 104

More Licks Up the Neck

Hawkeye Herman is back with some more classic blues licks that span the length of the fretboard.

Length: 26:20 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 105

Bass Licks

Hawkeye explains the importance of playing licks over the entire neck of the guitar.

Length: 21:33 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 106

Rock Me Lick

Hawkeye Herman shares a lick that is commonly known as the "Rock Me Baby" Lick. He explains how this lick can be incorporated into a performance of this classic B.B. King song.

Length: 19:09 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 107

Turnaround Positions

Hawkeye discusses how ideas derived from turnarounds can be incorporated into blues solos.

Length: 8:19 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 108

Instrumental Themes

Hawkeye Herman talks about instrumental themes and how you can add lead fills to them.

Length: 18:03 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 109

Instrumental Themes Continued

Hawkeye continues his discussion on instrumental themes and blues.

Length: 23:42 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 110

Ninth Chords

Hawkeye Herman explains how dominant 9th chords are formed and how they can be used in blues music.

Length: 15:16 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 111

Ninth Chords Continued

Hawkeye Herman continues his discussion on 9th chords.

Length: 26:52 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 112

More Eight Bar Blues

Hawkeye Herman shares more eight bar blues knowledge in this fun and information-packed lesson.

Length: 23:57 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 113

Using a Tuner

Hawkeye shares his thoughts on tuners in this lesson.

Length: 6:38 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
Lesson 114

Introducing the Capo

In the 114th installment of his Blues Series, Hawkeye introduces the capo. He demonstrates how this valuable tool allows you to transpose chord voicings to various keys.

Length: 23:21 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 115

Forming Barre Chords

Having trouble getting those fingers to form barre chords? In lesson #115 of his Blues Series, Hawkeye covers some tips and techniques to help with these problematic chord shapes. Any beginner can master...

Length: 10:03 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 116

4 Up, 5 Down Applied Concept

Hawkeye explains why the adjacent strings on the guitar are tuned in perfect fourths and how this relates to left hand fingering.

Length: 18:44 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 117

Relative Chord Shapes

Hawkeye continues where he left off in lesson 116 and explains how the tuning of the guitar relates to commonly used chord shapes.

Length: 16:43 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 118

Transposing Notes / Changing the Key

Hawkeye Herman reviews important transposition concepts. Here he demonstrates how to change the key of a song so that it is appropriate for your vocal range.

Length: 20:31 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 119

All About Finger Picking

Hawkeye takes a look at this important right hand technique.

Length: 20:54 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 120

Bo Diddley Beat

Hawkeye provides a history lesson on Bo Diddley. He also demonstrates how to play the classic "Bo Diddley Beat." This rhythmic pattern appears in countless blues and rock songs.

Length: 20:15 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 121

Thematic Bass Lines

Hawkeye teaches some blues bass lines that can be applied to the twelve bar blues form.

Length: 19:04 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 122

Bass Lines Continued

Hawkeye continues on from his 121st lesson with more examples of blues bass lines for guitar.

Length: 7:14 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 123

Lead Bass Ideas

Hawkeye dives into some lead bass ideas. He demonstrates how a classic Eric Clapton riff can be used over the twelve bar blues form in any key.

Length: 12:57 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 124

Willie's Bounce

Hawkeye teaches the bass line riff to his song "Willie's Bounce."

Length: 16:31 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 125

Finger Picking Part 2

Hawkeye continues his discussion on finger picking.

Length: 12:27 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 126

The Texas A

Hawkeye Herman teaches a version of the A chord that he calls "The Texas A."

Length: 13:59 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 127

Blues Scale: Adding the Major 3rd

Hawkeye breaks down the blues scale and demonstrates how to appropriately add the major 3rd.

Length: 26:16 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 128

Double Stops

As demonstrated in previous lessons, Hawkeye opens up the world of double stops. Hawkeye teaches some classic Chuck Berry licks to demonstrate how double stops can be used effectively.

Length: 11:53 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 129

Scrapper Blackwell

Hawkeye introduces the guitar stye of Scrapper Blackwell. He uses the song Scrapper called "E Blues" as a starting point.

Length: 20:46 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 130

Influence of Blind Lemon Jefferson

History flows deep in blues music. Hawkeye discusses the influence of Blind Lemon Jefferson. This lesson is one for the history books.

Length: 22:43 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 131

Humming and Strumming

Hawkeye opens up some ideas on how to "plan ahead" in your playing. Similar to riding a bike, you need to look forward to see where your going. Humming what you want to play allows you to anticipate the...

Length: 18:49 Difficulty: 4.0 Members Only
Lesson 132

Katrina, Oh Katrina

Inspired by the tragedy of Hurricane Katrina, Hawkeye was commissioned by the BBC to write a song about Katrina. Hawkeye demonstrates this song and recalls his thought process in writing this song.

Length: 29:53 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 133

All About the Hammer-on

Hawkeye demonstrates how a hammer-on can be used to open up doors in your playing. Hawkeye shows you how to achieve this technique and use it successfully in your playing.

Length: 24:07 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 134

The Pull-off

Hawkeye covers the pull-off, best friend of the hammer on. This technique is used to achieve the same goal as the hammer-on, yet with a completely different finger movement.

Length: 15:02 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 135

Using Hammer-ons and Pull-offs Together

Hawkeye combines lessons 133 and 134 and demonstrates some examples of how to utilize the hammer-on and pull-off techniques together to enhance your overall blues guitar skills.

Length: 10:27 Difficulty: 3.5 Members Only
Lesson 136

The Quick Change

The 12 bar form is a staple in the world of blues music. However, there are plenty of different ways to arrange it. This lesson covers what is commonly called "The Quick Change."

Length: 15:15 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Lesson 137

Starting on the IV Chord

Hawkeye demonstrates how to change up a traditional 12 bar blues progression by starting on the IV chord.

Length: 16:51 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 138

The Talking Blues

Hawkeye demonstrates yet another form of blues known as the "Talking Blues." This style is indicative of its name. It features a talking vocal style played over a I, IV, V chord progression.

Length: 24:43 Difficulty: 4.0 Members Only
Lesson 139

Utilizing 9th Chords

Need a slightly different voicing to spice up your playing? 9th chords will give your blues playing a colorful, urban sound.

Length: 24:53 Difficulty: 3.5 Members Only
Lesson 140

Minor Tuning, Major Sound

Hawkeye breaks out his slide and demonstrates how chord progressions in major keys can be played in open minor tunings.

Length: 4:43 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Lesson 141

Style of Elmore James

Hawkeye offers up some tricks and techniques that Elmore James utilized in his style of playing.

Length: 25:52 Difficulty: 3.5 Members Only
Lesson 142

Style of Son House

In lesson 142, Hawkeye dives into the style of Son House. House pioneered an innovative style featuring strong, repetitive rhythms often played with a slide.

Length: 14:32 Difficulty: 3.5 Members Only

About Hawkeye Herman View Full Biography ""One of America's finest acoustic guitarists and blues educators."
Cascade Blues Association

"Herman plays with a sensitive, reflective touch that continually draws attention to his vocals, which are effectively understated and free of affectation... Herman can rock with the best of them. A solid choice for fans of traditional acoustic blues."
Living Blues Magazine

" ...plays haunting music on a mournful guitar."
Los Angeles Times

"The only thing better than hearing this live album is seeing Hawkeye Herman in the flesh. Whether adding his own spin to blues classics or offering his own songs, Herman is a one-man history of blues, noteworthy guitar player and inimitable communicator. Miss him at your peril."
Blues Access

With over 40 years of performing experience, Michael "Hawkeye" Herman personifies the range of possibilities in blues and folk music. His dynamic blues guitar playing and vocal abilities have won him a faithful following and he leads a very active touring schedule of performances at festivals, concerts, school programs and educational workshops throughout the U.S., Canada, and Europe. His original music has been included in video dramas and documentaries and in four hit theatrical productions.

In 2000, Hawkeye was awarded Philadelphia's Barrymore Award for Excellence in Theatre for best original music in a theatrical production. "Everyday Living," Hawkeye's first nationally released album from 1987, now reissued on CD, features the late blues giants Charles Brown and "Cool Papa" Sadler, and established the demand for his now long-standing festival and concert touring. His latest CDs and DVD, "Blues Alive!" (CD), "It's All Blues To Me" (CD), and "Hawkeye Live In Concert" (DVD) have been greeted with rave reviews. Hawkeye's journalistic efforts have been published in numerous national and regional blues and music-related periodicals.

In 1998 he was the recipient of the Blues Foundation's "Keeping The Blues Alive" award for achievement in education. He served on the Board of Directors of the Blues Foundation for six years. Hawkeye was inducted into the Iowa Blues Hall of fame in 2004. In September of 2005, Hawkeye composed, at the request of the British Broadcasting Company (BBC), "Katrina, Oh Katrina (Hurricane Blues)," detailing the hurricane disaster on the Gulf Coast. The song was aired to over 7 million listeners on the popular "BBC Today" program. He is the cofounder of the Rogue Valley Blues Festival, Ashland, OR.

This musician has definitely carved out a spot for himself in the contemporary acoustic blues/folk field, and has earned a reputation as one of the most accomplished artists in the genre, and audiences throughout the US/Canada/Europe have come to know and appreciate Hawkeye's talent, dedication, and captivating performances.

Acoustic Guitar Lessons

Our acoustic guitar lessons are taught by qualified instructors with various backgrounds with the instrument.


Marcelo Berestovoy Marcelo Berestovoy

Marcelo teaches the eight basic right hand moves for the Rumba Flamenca strum pattern. He then shows you how to apply it...

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Jessica Baron Jessica Baron

Jessica kindly introduces herself, her background, and her approach to this series.

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David Isaacs David Isaacs

JamPlay welcomes David Isaacs to our teacher roster. With his first lesson Dave explains his approach to playing guitar with...

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Miche Fambro Miche Fambro

Miche introduces several new chord concepts that add color and excitement to any progression.

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Trace Bundy Trace Bundy

Trace Bundy talks about the different ways you can use multiple capos to enhance your playing.

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Mark Kailana Nelson Mark Kailana Nelson

Mark Nelson introduces "'Ulupalakua," a song he will be using to teach different skills and techniques. In this lesson, he...

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Randall Williams Randall Williams

In this lesson Randall introduces the partial capo (using a short-cut capo by Kyser) and talks about how it can make the...

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Hawkeye Herman Hawkeye Herman

Hawkeye teaches several Robert Johnson licks in this lesson. These licks are played with a slide in open G tuning.

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Pamela Goldsmith Pamela Goldsmith

Pamela brings a cap to her first 13 JamPlay lessons with another original etude inspired by the great Leo Brouwer. This is...

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Steve Eulberg Steve Eulberg

Steve Eulberg does a quick review of this lesson series and talks about moving on.

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Electric Guitar Lesson Samples

Our electric guitar lessons are taught by instructors with an incredible amount of teaching experience.


John March John March

Take a new look at the fretboard and learn where to find a voicing that works. There are techniques that simplify the fretboard...

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Allen Van Wert Allen Van Wert

Allen shows you the 24 rudiments crucial to developing finger dexterity. This is a short lesson but the exercises here can...

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Glen Drover Glen Drover

Lesson 25 from Glen presents a detailed exercise that firmly builds up fret hand dexterity for both speed and accuracy.

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Kenny Ray Kenny Ray

Albert Collins brought a lot of style to the blues scene. In this lesson, Kenny breaks down Albert's style for you to learn.

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Matt Brown Matt Brown

Matt Brown shows off some ways to add some creativity and originality to your rock chord voicings.

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Will Ripley Will Ripley

Join Will Ripley as he gives us all the details of his series, "Rock Guitar for Beginners". You'll be playing cool rock riffs...

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David MacKenzie David MacKenzie

David MacKenzie introduces the tapping technique and teaches a fun exercise. This lesson includes a backing track.

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Nick Greathouse Nick Greathouse

Nick starts his series with Alternate Picking part 1. Improve your timing, speed, and execution with this important lesson.

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Tosin Abasi Tosin Abasi

Tosin explains some of the intricacies of the 8 string guitar such as his personal setup and approach to playing.

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Each chord in our library contains a full chart, related tablature, and a photograph of how the chord is played. A comprehensive learning resource for any guitarist.

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At JamPlay, not only can you reference our Chord Library, but you can also select any variety of chords you need to work on, and generate your own printable chord sheet.

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