Minor Pentatonic in Open and First Position (Guitar Lesson)

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DJ Phillips

Minor Pentatonic in Open and First Position

DJ begins a discussion of the minor pentatonic scale patterns. He demonstrates the A minor pentatonic scale in first or "open" position.

Taught by DJ Phillips in Blues Guitar with DJ seriesLength: 12:16Difficulty: 1.5 of 5
Chapter 1: (00:43) Lesson Introduction At this point, DJ has demonstrated how to play one vertical pattern for the minor pentatonic scale. This fifth position pattern is the most commonly used pattern. In total, there are five vertical fretboard patterns. In this lesson and the lessons that follow, DJ explains how to play the remaining patterns. Exercises are provided to help you become more familiar with each of the patterns. In addition, you will learn how each of the pentatonic patterns can be transposed to all 12 minor keys. Some sample licks in each position are included in these lessons. These licks will give you a taste of how each pattern is used in a practical blues context.

Learning and memorizing the five patterns is absolutely essential for every guitarist. When connected, the five pentatonic patterns span the entire length of the fretboard. This enables you to utilize the entire range of the guitar when improvising the entire range of the guitar. If you study the tablature to some of your favorite guitar solos, you will notice that guitarists frequently shift in and out of several pentatonic patterns within a single solo.
Chapter 2: (01:54) Minor Pentatonic: First Position Definition of Position

The minor pentatonic pattern demonstrated in this scene is played in first position. Typically, position is defined by where the first finger plays on the fretboard. Within first position, the first finger plays all of the notes at the first fret. Subsequently, the second finger frets notes at the second fret. Notes at the third fret are played by the third finger. All notes at the fourth fret are played by the pinkie finger.

First position is sometimes referred to as "open" position when a particular scale or melody line includes one or more open string notes.

Left Hand Fingering

As you practice through this new pattern, do not deviate from the left-hand fingering that DJ demonstrates in the lesson video. When playing a solo, fingerings might need to be adjusted to accommodate a specific lick. For now however, use the fingering that he has indicated. This fingering represents the most practical way of playing through the scale. It will allow you to play through the scale with maximum speed and control.

Location of Root Notes

Unlike the pentatonic pattern you learned previously, the root note is not the lowest note within the first position pattern. The open sixth string is actually the lowest note. Always remember where the root notes are located within each scale pattern. The root note A is the open fifth string. It is also located at the 2nd fret of the third string. The location of the root notes becomes essential when DJ demonstrates how this pattern can be transposed to a different key.
Chapter 3: (02:22) Scale Exercise In this scene, DJ demonstrates a few exercise that will help you become more familiar with this new pattern. Practicing these types of exercises is a great way to prepare your fingers for the techniques necessary to playing guitar solos. Play each exercise along with a metronome to ensure that your rhythm remains clear and steady.

Exercise 1

This exercise works your hammer-on technique. Hammer from the lowest note on each string to the next note. Ascend the strings in the this fashion. Once you reach the highest string, descend back down using the same hammer-on pattern. Watch DJ in the lesson video for a demonstration. Tablature and notation to each exercise presented in the lesson can be found under the "Supplemental Content" tab.

Hammer-on Rules

1. Pay VERY close attention to the rhythm in which a hammer on is to be played. Many inexperienced guitarists cut the first note (the picked note) way too short. Consequently, the hammer on note is held for too long. For starters, practice all hammer-ons and pull-offs in an even eighth note rhythm.

2. Performing a hammer-on requires a forceful movement with a left-hand finger. The tone of a hammer-on is much clearer and louder when the hammering finger comes down fast and forcefully. If you bring your finger down to slow, the hammer-on will be weak or inaudible.

3. All rules regarding proper left-hand finger placement in relation to the frets become even more crucial when playing hammer-ons. Hammer the finger down right behind the fret. Hammering on top of a fret or too far from it will result in a poor tone.

4. Use the hard calluses on the tips of the fingers when making contact with the strings. This will help generate a louder tone.

Exercise 2

Within this exercise, a pull-off is performed between the notes on each string in the pattern. Pick the higher of the two notes on a string. Then, pull-off back to the lower note. Ascend and descend the pattern in this fashion.

Pull-off Rules

1. The plucked note and the subsequent pull-off must be equal in volume.

2. Pull the finger straight down towards the floor when playing a pull-off. This will create the best tone.

3. Be careful that you do not pull your finger down too far. This may cause one of the adjacent strings to vibrate.

4. Once again, make sure that both notes are perfectly equal from a rhythmic standpoint.

Exercise 3

This exercise is a combination of exercises 1 and 2. First, perform a hammer-on between the two notes on each string. Then, perform a pull-off.

Previous Exercises

Continue to practice the exercises that DJ demonstrate in the previous lesson. Apply these exercises to the new pattern presented in this lesson. Also, apply exercises from this lesson to the fifth position pattern of the minor pentatonic scale. As you learn more exercises, you may want to develop a weekly practice schedule to ensure that you cover each exercise at some point during the week.
Chapter 4: (03:28) First Position Riffs Muddy Waters Style Riff

In past lessons, DJ has demonstrated several different rhythmic patterns can be applied to the 12 bar blues progression. You've learned the shuffle pattern and several of its variations. DJ also explained how to play this progression in a funky scratch rhythm that utilizes dominant ninth chords. Basic riffs derived from the pentatonic scale are also commonly applied to the blues form.

The first riff that DJ explains is played in the style of Muddy Waters. Notice how the riff is altered slightly to fit the context of the chord changes. For example, the riff ends with the tonic A note when played over the I chord in the first four bar. It ends with the note D when played over the IV chord, D major.

Crossroads Riff

Cream recorded a popular cover version of Robert Johnson's classic song Crossroads on the album Wheels of Fire. Cream performs this song in the key of A. Guitarist Eric Clapton plays a catchy, repeating riff over the tonic A chord. This riff is derived from the first position pattern of the A minor pentatonic scale. Unlike the Muddy Waters style riff, this new riff is not transposed to the IV and V chords in Crossroads. An arpeggiation of the D7 and E5 chords is played instead.

Notice how DJ alters the fingering of the minor pentatonic scale as he plays this riff. This is one example of how the fingering will change within the context of a lick or riff.
Chapter 5: (03:47) Transposition DJ transposes the open A minor pentatonic scale to the key of Bb minor. When transposing a scale in open position, think of the nut as an actual fret. Then slide the entire pattern up. Use the root notes within the pattern as a guide. For example, the root note within this pattern is found on the fifth string. When a scale is transposed, the interval distances between the notes remains the same. The visual pattern for the scale remains identical as well.

Fingering

When a pattern containing open string notes is transposed, some fingering adjustments must be made. As the pattern is shifted up the fretboard, the open string notes become fretted notes. The first finger now must fret all notes that were once open strings.

Transposition to the Remaining Keys

Transpose this pentatonic pattern to the remaining ten minor keys. DJ gets you started with the key of Eb. First, find the location of the note Eb on the fifth string. This note will indicate which position the pattern must be transposed to. If you do not have the note names across the entire fretboard memorized, you must at least know the pattern of whole and half steps within the musical scale. This will enable you to find any note on the fretboard. The note Eb is located at the 6th fret of the fifth string. Consequently, this pattern is played in sixth position when playing in the key of Eb minor.

Apply the exercises from scene 3 to each new key. Also, transpose the Muddy Waters and "Crossroads" riffs to each new key. The fingering for these riffs must be altered when playing in any key other than A minor.

Preview of Next Lesson

DJ continues to explore the minor pentatonic patterns in the following lesson. The second position pattern is covered next. Similar to this lesson, you will learn a few new exercises and licks within this fretboard pattern. You will also learn how to transpose the new pattern to all 12 minor keys.

Video Subtitles / Captions


Comments

Member Comments about this Lesson

Discussions with our instructors are just one of the many benefits of becoming a member of JamPlay.


PaoloserPaoloser replied

lesson ex pag 2, I don t think it's right transcribing that riff in that way the first note the bass E it s not on the first beat but on the up before then on the beat there is a triplet and then...

mkesnermkesner replied

man I messed that up - I meant 0-3, 0-2, 0-2, 0-2, 0-3, 0-3

dash rendardash rendar replied

mkesner, it would be 0-3, 0-2, 0-2, 0-2, 0-3, 0-3 if we were playing an E minor pentatonic in the open position. But DJ is starting with A minor pentatonic at the open position. So, your fingering would be appropriate at fret 5. Some might consider the 5-8, 5-7, 5-7, 5-7, 5-8, 5-8 to be the 1st pattern of the A minor pentatonic. If you make that assumtion, then the open position DJ is showing us could be considered the 3rd pattern.

gregorycarlsongregorycarlson replied

OK, that is a cool little exercise! Thanks for that!

kf7soviet3kf7soviet3 replied

It looks as if the position of the pentatonic scale taught here is the fourth position as taught by Brad Henecke's Rock series.

floorshakerfloorshaker replied

Mmmmmm - Scales. Amazing how quickly my fingers are picking up the positions. Makes me feel more confident moving around the guitar neck. DJ, I would just like to know which scales you think are most likely to be of use at this stage? Brad teaches the blues scales first and you have started with pentatonic. Is one more useful than the other when you are a beginner like me? Thanks

mkesnermkesner replied

Hi DJ I am a little confused about this 1st posyion...I thought in the open or first postion would be 0-3, 0-2, 0-2, 0-2, 0-5, 0-3. Can you explain please?

Blues Guitar with DJ

Found in our Beginner Lesson Sets

DJ Phillips will teach you everything you need to know to become a master of the blues with an emphasis on fast-paced techniques & playing.



Series IntroductionLesson 1

Series Introduction

Meet Mr. DJ Phillips & learn what he's going to teach you throughout this series.

Length: 2:30 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only
12 Bar BluesLesson 2

12 Bar Blues

Learn what makes a chord progression a blues progression as well as the basics to the famous 12 bar blues.

Length: 13:18 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Rhythmic VariationsLesson 3

Rhythmic Variations

Time to take the 12 bar blues progression you've learned and add in some rhythmic variations.

Length: 8:48 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
12 Bar Blues Chord VariationsLesson 4

12 Bar Blues Chord Variations

Now that you've learned the 12 bar blues and some rhythmic variations, it's time to throw in some chord variations.

Length: 6:22 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Minor Pentatonic ScaleLesson 5

Minor Pentatonic Scale

Time to take a break from the 12 bar blues and start mastering some lead techniques. This all starts with the minor pentatonic scale.

Length: 8:13 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Minor Pentatonic Scale VariationsLesson 6

Minor Pentatonic Scale Variations

Now that you've learned the minor pentatonic scale, it's time to learn how to move it around.

Length: 11:10 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
SRV - The House Is Rockin'Lesson 7

SRV - The House Is Rockin'

Learn a handful of new blues techniques while learning to play Stevie Ray Vaughn's "The House Is Rockin'".

Length: 49:58 Difficulty: 3.0 FREE
Funky Blues RhythmLesson 8

Funky Blues Rhythm

Now that you've mastered some SRV, DJ is going to show you some funky blues rhythms that use the 9th chords.

Length: 8:44 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Minor Pentatonic in Open and First PositionLesson 9

Minor Pentatonic in Open and First Position

DJ begins a discussion of the minor pentatonic scale patterns. He demonstrates the A minor pentatonic scale in first or "open" position.

Length: 12:16 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Minor Pentatonic in Second PositionLesson 10

Minor Pentatonic in Second Position

Continuing on with the minor pentatonic scale, DJ covers the second position. As with lesson 9, he provides a few exercises and riffs along the way.

Length: 10:11 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Minor Pentatonic in Fifth PositionLesson 11

Minor Pentatonic in Fifth Position

Continuing with the A minor pentatonic scale, DJ returns with a lesson on the fifth position pattern.

Length: 7:09 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Minor Pentatonic in Seventh PositionLesson 12

Minor Pentatonic in Seventh Position

In this lesson, DJ covers the A minor pentatonic scale in 7th position. He includes licks and riffs to help with skill building.

Length: 8:49 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Minor Pentatonic in Ninth PositionLesson 13

Minor Pentatonic in Ninth Position

This lesson covers the 9th position of the A minor pentatonic scale. DJ provides licks, riffs, and a string skipping exercise.

Length: 15:00 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Moving PositionsLesson 14

Moving Positions

Now that DJ has covered all five patterns of the minor pentatonic scale, he explains how to shift from one pattern to the next.

Length: 6:12 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Major PentatonicLesson 15

Major Pentatonic

Now that DJ has covered the minor pentatonic positions, he shifts gears to the major pentatonic scale.

Length: 17:34 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Moving Across PositionsLesson 16

Moving Across Positions

In this lesson, DJ demonstrates a number of major pentatonic licks that feature position shifts.

Length: 5:15 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Combining Major and Minor PentatonicsLesson 17

Combining Major and Minor Pentatonics

DJ demonstrates how to combine the major and minor pentatonic scales. He provides a number of combined scale licks for you to learn.

Length: 12:54 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Solo and Lead LinesLesson 18

Solo and Lead Lines

In this lesson, DJ demonstrates how to build an effective guitar solo.

Length: 9:13 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
RhythmLesson 19

Rhythm

This lesson details the importance of rhythm within solos and lead lines.

Length: 6:10 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Improvising Lesson 20

Improvising

DJ talks about the art of improvising in this lesson. Always begin with a grand entrance and end with a big finish.

Length: 7:59 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Building Chords on the 6th StringLesson 21

Building Chords on the 6th String

DJ begins a discussion of colorful dominant chord voicings. He demonstrates how to build chords from a root note on the 6th string.

Length: 9:38 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Building Chords on the 4th and 5th StringLesson 22

Building Chords on the 4th and 5th String

Continuing on from lesson 21, DJ explains how to build dominant chords from root notes on the 4th and 5th strings.

Length: 8:26 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Using Different VoicingsLesson 23

Using Different Voicings

In lesson 23, DJ demonstrates how various chord voicings can be used while playing rhythm or lead over a 12 bar blues progression.

Length: 4:49 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Mute RakingLesson 24

Mute Raking

With lesson 24, DJ begins a short segment on tricks of the trade. First, he discusses and demonstrates string rakes.

Length: 5:08 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Organ LicksLesson 25

Organ Licks

DJ explains how B3 organ licks can be played on guitar.

Length: 4:11 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Volume SwellsLesson 26

Volume Swells

In this lesson, DJ talks about volume swells and how they can be used.

Length: 4:37 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Walking Bass and Upstroke ShuffleLesson 27

Walking Bass and Upstroke Shuffle

Continuing with his "tricks of the trade" lessons, DJ demonstrates a walking bass line and the upstroke shuffle.

Length: 6:51 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
SlideLesson 28

Slide

In this lesson, DJ discusses and demonstrates the basics of slide technique.

Length: 5:28 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Wah Pedals Lesson 29

Wah Pedals

DJ demonstrates some of the subtleties of using a wah pedal in the blues style.

Length: 3:50 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
HarmonicsLesson 30

Harmonics

DJ discusses and demonstrates natural, artificial (harp), and pinch harmonics in the blues style.

Length: 8:37 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Aspects of ToneLesson 31

Aspects of Tone

DJ delves into tone in lesson 31. He discusses how and why certain tones are achieved.

Length: 21:41 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Minor BluesLesson 32

Minor Blues

With lesson 32, DJ introduces the minor form of the 12 bar blues progression.

Length: 4:57 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Using the Dominant V7 ChordLesson 33

Using the Dominant V7 Chord

Building on his minor blues set, DJ discusses how to utilize the dominant V7 chord to spice up the standard progression.

Length: 4:14 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Minor Turnaround Lesson 34

Minor Turnaround

DJ demonstrates a couple turnaround techniques that can be applied to the 12 bar minor blues progression.

Length: 6:13 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Minor 7 VoicingsLesson 35

Minor 7 Voicings

In this lesson, DJ discusses some minor 7 voicings with roots on the 6th, 5th, and 4th strings.

Length: 9:12 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Minor 6th VoicingsLesson 36

Minor 6th Voicings

Much like lesson 35, DJ discusses minor 6th chord voicings with roots on the 6th, 5th, and 4th strings.

Length: 8:53 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Extensions of the V7 ChordLesson 37

Extensions of the V7 Chord

DJ explains how altered extensions such as the b9 and #9 can be added to the V7 chord within the context of a minor blues progression.

Length: 8:35 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Scale OptionsLesson 38

Scale Options

DJ discusses the scale options that can be used over a minor blues progression.

Length: 2:21 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Minor Scale PositionsLesson 39

Minor Scale Positions

In this lesson, DJ builds upon lesson 38 and covers the minor scale positions across the entire fretboard.

Length: 5:11 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
T-Bone WalkerLesson 40

T-Bone Walker

DJ profiles blues guitarist T-Bone Walker in lesson 40.

Length: 31:23 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
T-Bone ShuffleLesson 41

T-Bone Shuffle

Profiling T-Bone walker, DJ will demonstrate the T-Bone Shuffle.

Length: 29:26 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Skills and Concepts of T-Bone WalkerLesson 42

Skills and Concepts of T-Bone Walker

DJ discusses and demonstrates skills acquired from learning T-Bone Walker's material.

Length: 17:42 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Bo-DiddleyLesson 43

Bo-Diddley

DJ will take a look at Blues guitarist Bo Diddley and teach you the "Bo Diddley beat."

Length: 13:26 Difficulty: 1.5 Members Only
Blues with DJ: More Bo DiddleyLesson 44

Blues with DJ: More Bo Diddley

Dj is back yet again with more on the style of Bo Diddley. Here is will dive more into his style of solos as well as an in depth explanation of how the songs are played out. Get comfortable everyone and...

Length: 22:15 Difficulty: 2.0 Members Only
Implementing Bo Diddley's Style Lesson 45

Implementing Bo Diddley's Style

Dj brings a kicking finish to the style of Bo Diddley by teaching you how to implement his style of playing to your's. With a quick review of what he has taught so far, Dj will play the backing track as...

Length: 10:59 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #1Lesson 46

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #1

DJ returns to his blues guitar series with the introduction of a complete blues solo. Through the next 12 lessons, DJ will provide a phrase-by-phrase breakdown of the solo. By the end of this mini-series,...

Length: 3:38 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #2Lesson 47

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #2

DJ is back with Phrase #2 of the Swing Blues Solo. This lick is designed to outline the IV chord.

Length: 3:10 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #3Lesson 48

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #3

DJ is back with another phrase of his swing blues solo. The third phrase of the first solo is also your first turnaround. In this lick, you'll outline the chords that bring us back to the top of the form.

Length: 3:22 Difficulty: 0.0 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #4Lesson 49

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #4

The fourth phrase of your first solo has a lot of pentatonic influence in it. You've also climbed the neck to the upper register to help build your solo.

Length: 2:29 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #5Lesson 50

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #5

We're back to the second phrase in the long form blues again. This lick picks up where the last left off and continues to build suspense in the upper register.

Length: 3:11 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #6Lesson 51

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #6

DJ is back with the sixth phrase of his Swing Blues Solo. We're now at the second turnaround of the long form. This lick incorporates chromaticism to build tension.

Length: 4:26 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #7Lesson 52

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #7

We're back to the top in the 3rd chorus of the blues solo. This lick starts to amp up the solo by adding more bends and a few double stops.

Length: 3:47 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #8Lesson 53

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #8

DJ is back with the eighth phrase in the swing blues solo. The second phrase of the 3rd chorus incorporates hammer-ons.

Length: 3:14 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #9Lesson 54

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #9

DJ is back with the ninth phrase in the swing blues solo. For the third time, we find ourselves at the turnaround. This lick plays on the idea of a repeating figure followed up by a scale run.

Length: 4:46 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #10Lesson 55

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #10

We really start to add some gusto to the solo for our final three phrases. This lick uses open stringed double stops and position shifting to create a long build up towards the solo's climax.

Length: 3:40 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #11Lesson 56

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #11

The eleventh phrase of our long form blues solo continues to build on the previous phrase. This time you'll be using a repeated but slightly varied figure along with double stops to create more build-up.

Length: 3:34 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #12Lesson 57

Swing Blues Solo - Phrase #12

DJ is back with the final phrase of the swing blues solo. This turnaround lick uses quick bends, repeated figures, and a chromatic walk down to twist your ear before finally resolving back to E.

Length: 5:42 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #1Lesson 58

Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #1

Now that you've completed the first solo of a long form blues, it's time to tackle the second solo. This next blues is played in straight eighths and starts off with some chromatic notes, bending, and...

Length: 3:13 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #2Lesson 59

Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #2

Dig into the second phrase of our straight blues solo! This one uses double stops, bends, and vibrato to kick the solo into high gear!

Length: 3:10 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #3Lesson 60

Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #3

The first turnaround in our straight blues solo uses a low walking melody along with a scale run that brings us back up to the top.

Length: 2:53 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #4Lesson 61

Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #4

As we return to the top for the second round of our long form, we hear a familiar melody. This one is stolen right from the last phrase, only it's been transposed up into a higher register.

Length: 2:36 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #5Lesson 62

Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #5

We're getting into the meat of this solo and it's time we started rocking! We amp up the energy by using some down picking and scale lines.

Length: 2:59 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #6Lesson 63

Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #6

We've now reached the second turnaround of our long form blues. This phrase gets a little funky with some position shifting and double stops.

Length: 4:08 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #7Lesson 64

Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #7

Here, we return to the top and continue the funky feel from the turnaround. This lick features chromatic runs with vibrato and a repeated figure.

Length: 3:41 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #8Lesson 65

Straight Blues Solo - Phrase #8

The next lick in our long form straight blues is all about syncopation and getting that dirty tone from the amp. Careful rhythmic placement of rests and the use of double stops help us accomplish this.

Length: 1:59 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
DJ Phillips

About DJ Phillips View Full Biography Like many guitar players who began playing around the same time, DJ began plunking out Nirvana and Soundgarden tunes when he first picked up the guitar in the mid-nineties. While these grunge-y roots certainly have their merit, it wasn't until DJ's eldest sister took him to a Led Zeppelin laser light show that the full potential of the guitar began to come into focus.

With Jimmy Page's Les Paul pyrotechnics as his inspiration, DJ began fervently practicing for hours on end in the suburban jungle of Southwestern Ohio. This newfound passion (combined with his complete lack of athletic prowess and physical coordination thus completely ruling out all sports) led him to form rock bands in junior high and high school. He grew to love the performance aspect of music and soon decided on it as a career path.

College led him to Nashville, Tennessee where he began to pursue a degree in Commercial Music at Belmont University. He also started another band and got his first professional theater gig the following summer. Since that summer, DJ has spent nearly every waking hour finding ways to play music and avoiding a real contribution to society in any other way.

He moved to Minneapolis after college, rocking out between theater gigs with his current rock band Brother Big Bad. He has now convinced the band to move to Nashville where music flows like water.

DJ is elated to be a part of JamPlay and is thankful for everyone's warm welcome and says "Now, let's ROCK, people."

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Matt Brown shows off some ways to add some creativity and originality to your rock chord voicings.

Free LessonSeries Details
Chris Liepe Chris Liepe

Chris brings his ingenuity to this lesson on the American folk song called "Where Did You Sleep Last Night?" Also known as...

Free LessonSeries Details




Join over 511627 guitarists who have learned how to play in weeks... not years!

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Unlimited Lesson Viewing

A JamPlay membership gives you access to every lesson, from every teacher on our staff. Additionally, there is no restriction on how many times you watch a lesson. Watch as many times as you need.

Live Lessons

Exclusive only to JamPlay, we currently broadcast 8-10 hours of steaming lesson services directly to you! Enjoy the benefits of in-person instructors and the conveniences of our community.

Interactive Community

Create your own profile, manage your friends list, and contact users with your own JamPlay Mailbox. JamPlay also features live chat with teachers and members, and an active Forum.

Chord Library

Each chord in our library contains a full chart, related tablature, and a photograph of how the chord is played. A comprehensive learning resource for any guitarist.

Scale Library

Our software allows you to document your progress for any lesson, including notes and percent of the lesson completed. This gives you the ability to document what you need to work on, and where you left off.

Custom Chord Sheets

At JamPlay, not only can you reference our Chord Library, but you can also select any variety of chords you need to work on, and generate your own printable chord sheet.

Backing Tracks

Jam-along backing tracks give the guitarist a platform for improvising and soloing. Our backing tracks provide a wide variety of tracks from different genres of music, and serves as a great learning tool.

Interactive Games

We have teachers covering beginner lessons, rock, classic rock, jazz, bluegrass, fingerstyle, slack key and more. Learn how to play the guitar from experienced players, in a casual environment.

Beginners Welcome.. and Up

Unlike a lot of guitar websites and DVDs, we start our Beginner Lessons at the VERY start of the learning process, as if you just picked up a guitar for the first time.Our teaching is structured for all players.

Take a minute to compare JamPlay to other traditional and new methods of learning guitar. Our estimates for "In-Person" lessons below are based on a weekly face-to-face lesson for $40 per hour.

Series
Price Per Lesson < $0.01 $4 - $5 $30 - $50 Free
Money Back Guarantee Sometimes n/a
Number of Instructors 104 1 – 3 1 Zillions
Interaction with Instructors Daily Webcam Sessions Weekly
Professional Instructors Luck of the Draw Luck of the Draw
New Lessons Daily Weekly Minutely
Structured Lessons
Learn Any Style Sorta
Track Progress
HD Video - Sometimes
Multiple Camera Angles Sometimes - Sometimes
Accurate Tabs Maybe Maybe
Scale/Chord Libraries
Custom JamTracks
Interactive Games
Community
Learn in Sweatpants Socially Unacceptable
Gasoline Needed $0.00 $0.00 ~$4 / gallon! $0.00
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Mike H.

"I feel like a 12 year old kid with a new guitar!"
 

I am 66 years young and I still got it! I would have never known this if it had not been for Jamplay! I feel like a 12 year old kid with a new guitar! Ha! I cannot express enough how great you're website is! It is for beginners and advanced pickers! I am an advanced picker and thought I had lost it but thanks to you all, I found it again! Even though I only play by ear, I have been a member a whopping whole two weeks now and have already got Brent's country shuffle and country blues down and of course with embellishments. Thank you all for your wonderful program!


Greg J.

"With Jamplay I can fit in a random session when I have time and I can go at my own pace"
 

I'm a fifty eight year old newbie who owns a guitar which has been sitting untouched in a corner for about seven years now. Last weekend I got inspired to pick it up and finally learn how to play after watching an amazing Spanish guitarist on TV. So, here I am. I'm starting at the beginning with Steve Eulberg and I couldn't be happier (except for the sore fingers :) Some day I'm going to play like Steve! I'm self employed with a hectic schedule. With Jamplay I can fit in a random session when I have time and I can go at my own pace, rewinding and replaying the videos until I get it. This is a very enjoyable diversion from my work yet I still feel like I'm accomplishing something worthwhile. Thanks a lot, Greg


Bill

"I believe this is the absolute best site for guitar students."
 

I am commenting here to tell you and everyone at JamPlay that I believe this is the absolute best site for guitar students. I truly enjoy learning to play the guitar on JamPlay.com. Yes, I said the words, ""enjoy learning."" It is by far the best deal for the money.



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