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3 on a String Scales (Guitar Lesson)


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Chris Liepe

3 on a String Scales

Chris Liepe starts off his Rock Essentials series with a lesson on 3 on a string scales. Utilizing 3, 4, and 6 note sequencing, Chris begins to dive into instrumental rock style phrasing and provides several licks influenced by the 3 on a string concept.

Taught by Chris Liepe in Rock Guitar with Chris Liepe seriesLength: 37:00Difficulty: 3.5 of 5


Video Subtitles / Captions


Member Comments about this Lesson

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gibsonsgj2014@hotmail.com[email protected] replied on October 17th, 2017

There's a problem of video Chris liege. It's hanging and also supplemental sometimes. Tnx

Jason.MounceJason.Mounce replied on October 17th, 2017

If you are having trouble with the video buffering, click on the "HD" button in the lower right hand corner of the lesson video. There, select a lower quality setting which will provide a smaller video file that is easier to stream without buffering. You may want to consider making sure that the browser you are using is up to date and also try clearing it's cache. Those two items generally cure about 95% of playback related issues. If you continue to have any trouble, please contact us at [email protected] and provide detailed specifics about what is occurring. We can help you more there.

Mcp501Mcp501 replied on September 16th, 2017

hi Chris. my pinky is very weak. can you give me a link to which i could find an exercise to strengthen my pinky. thanks

Bradley.ConwayBradley.Conway replied on September 18th, 2017

Hello Mcp501! Exercising your pinky can be tough! I went ahead and searched for some lessons pertaining to strengthening your pinky and found 5 lessons that I hope you will find to be helpful! All you need to do is copy and paste the following link into your browser: http://members.jamplay.com/search-results?search_text=pinky - Hope this helps! Happy Jamming!

leromanleroman replied on August 7th, 2017

Good lessons Chris, I'm considering strongly to get on board with Jam play.

cungar2000cungar2000 replied on July 18th, 2017

Sorry it posted so many times. Please clean up if you can.

cungar2000cungar2000 replied on July 18th, 2017

Chris, after really hitting this lesson hard it's the first time I've ever felt like I could play fast. I still haven't mastered the six on a string run all the way through ( afew flubs) but I'm amazed how well this lesson finally got me in the right rhythm and feel to play almost as fast as you. Thanks so much for this one.

cungar2000cungar2000 replied on July 18th, 2017

Chris, after really hitting this lesson hard it's the first time I've ever felt like I could play fast. I still haven't mastered the six on a string run all the way through ( afew flubs) but I'm amazed how well this lesson finally got me in the right rhythm and feel to play almost as fast as you. Thanks so much for this one.

cungar2000cungar2000 replied on July 18th, 2017

Chris, after really hitting this lesson hard it's the first time I've ever felt like I could play fast. I still haven't mastered the six on a string run all the way through ( afew flubs) but I'm amazed how well this lesson finally got me in the right rhythm and feel to play almost as fast as you. Thanks so much for this one.

cungar2000cungar2000 replied on July 18th, 2017

Chris, after really hitting this lesson hard it's the first time I've ever felt like I could play fast. I still haven't mastered the six on a string run all the way through ( afew flubs) but I'm amazed how well this lesson finally got me in the right rhythm and feel to play almost as fast as you. Thanks so much for this one.

cungar2000cungar2000 replied on July 18th, 2017

Chris, after really hitting this lesson hard it's the first time I've ever felt like I could play fast. I still haven't mastered the six on a string run all the way through ( afew flubs) but I'm amazed how well this lesson finally got me in the right rhythm and feel to play almost as fast as you. Thanks so much for this one.

cungar2000cungar2000 replied on July 18th, 2017

Chris, after really hitting this lesson hard it's the first time I've ever felt like I could play fast. I still haven't mastered the six on a string run all the way through ( afew flubs) but I'm amazed how well this lesson finally got me in the right rhythm and feel to play almost as fast as you. Thanks so much for this one.

cungar2000cungar2000 replied on July 18th, 2017

Chris, after really hitting this lesson hard it's the first time I've ever felt like I could play fast. I still haven't mastered the six on a string run all the way through ( afew flubs) but I'm amazed how well this lesson finally got me in the right rhythm and feel to play almost as fast as you. Thanks so much for this one.

cungar2000cungar2000 replied on July 18th, 2017

Chris, after really hitting this lesson hard it's the first time I've ever felt like I could play fast. I still haven't mastered the six on a string run all the way through ( afew flubs) but I'm amazed how well this lesson finally got me in the right rhythm and feel to play almost as fast as you. Thanks so much for this one.

KlatoKlato replied on June 8th, 2017

in the A position you say three strings in a row of 134 134 134 but you are playing 124 124 124 that is 2 3 On a string scales

fazmfazm replied on February 28th, 2017

is anyone else having trouble looking at the supplemental content? I can load the first tab just find the others seem just like broken links.

josh66112josh66112 replied on January 26th, 2017

What speed should you be able to play each exercise before moving on to the next?

deb.cawleydeb.cawley replied on January 26th, 2017

You can move onto the next lesson, when you feel you have mastered it. If the speed of the lesson is going to fast for you to learn the piece, you can adjust it, by selecting the "100%" tab below the video lessons arrow to slow down the pace to go at a rate more comfortable for you. You will find other feature functions below the video lessons as well to help you learn it, such as the "looping" feature by clicking on the circular arrow, that looks much like the "refresh" on your web browser. to set starting and stoping section of the portion of the video you are working on. This will keep replaying that section over and over by marking the starting point with the "A" and the ending point with the "B". The goldstar is a bookmarking feature to mark the area of the video you want to start at, rather than starting at the beginning of the video and watching it all the way through to the end. Hope that answers your question.

Brandon30Brandon30 replied on December 30th, 2015

Great exercises, I really feel like these help improve speed, dexterity, etc. Thanks Chris.

Southern CashSouthern Cash replied on November 17th, 2015

I noticed when you pick the first note then legato the remaining notes that those notes are not discernable if you had picked them?

shanegibson1shanegibson1 replied on March 5th, 2015

This is awesome! Thanks Chris!

kulumookulumoo replied on February 17th, 2015

it's really good and helpful .thank's Chris

brojakbrojak replied on December 29th, 2014

I'm wondering why are there BPM backing tracks for A , B, C , D ect? i just finished part 3 and I from what I understood everything was in the G scale?

majmurraymajmurray replied on July 7th, 2017

The entire lesson, fingering, muscle memory and melody will be the same if you move this off of G (key/tonality) to another key. So those backing tracks help those who take this to the next step. Old question, but maybe some folks will still benefit from my reply. And you can do this practice session for other scale modes, too. I suggest memorizing the scale mode patterns and then explore this practice style in all of the keys and their modes, then move to harmonic minor, and so forth

bam711711bam711711 replied on November 6th, 2014

GREAT LESSON THANKS

pakutkacpakutkac replied on June 28th, 2014

Excellent lesson. exactly what I was looking for. wow you made this in 2011...I'm kinda behind.

DashooterDashooter replied on April 21st, 2014

The legato part going back down the scale is pretty tough. Soon I'll sound like Joe Satch :D

kd44kd44 replied on January 11th, 2014

Hey Chris, I couldn't find any other way to contact Jamplay with a request for a song.. I'd like to learn Stranglehold and I think you are just the man to teach that lesson.. Just asking, no big deal. :-)

tuggey5150tuggey5150 replied on November 21st, 2013

Chris, Where were you 10 years ago… You've broken the mystery for me! Just the explanation on string noise when doing legato technique made things all the better for me. I will be practicing this lesson series for some time. Thank you.

kd44kd44 replied on November 6th, 2013

Question: are all of these "positions transposable to other keys? Like for instance: Can you play pattern/position 1 starting on A in the key of A, and pattern/position 2 starting on B and so on and so forth? Great lesson by the way :-)

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on November 6th, 2013

absolutely, that's why they are so cool! :)

kd44kd44 replied on November 7th, 2013

Thanks for the reply, Chris, I wasn't sure if I made my question clear. :-)

kd44kd44 replied on November 4th, 2013

I was playing the 3 note per string scale... HA!... I'm almost sure this will hurt my old hands.. LOL

garrettwayne72garrettwayne72 replied on June 12th, 2013

Legato is kicking my ass! 2 months solid on this lesson. Maybe another month and I will have this in my pocket. I wish my brain could sync up with my fingers. Thx Chris!

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on June 14th, 2013

you are welcome!

ronyefronyef replied on April 10th, 2013

This is what I've been looking for!!

rpf13rpf13 replied on March 25th, 2013

O.k., well, there is really speed in this lesson - hey great! Just started with the Phase two (after Dave McKenzie in Phase 1) and I already have to say - Chris is THE man, new style and great sessions! Cool...

huntjasonhuntjason replied on February 19th, 2013

Okay... I've been at this for 5 weeks now. Figuring out how to create the scale (with whole and half steps) was phase one of my learning. The sequencing is really solidifying things for me. I figure that in the next couple weeks, I should have this down finally! I'll keep plugging away at it daily.

viehwoiderviehwoider replied on January 12th, 2013

wow...the pace is quite fast. in order to make those exercises at 120 bpm i will have to practice scales for at least another 4 weeks...or perhaps 2 months. i just made it trough Phase 1 and practicing scales is all i did for the last weeks. what about my ears? i think they could use some training too.

huntjasonhuntjason replied on January 11th, 2013

Spending my Friday night playing 3-on-a-string scales.

lonerockerlonerocker replied on January 4th, 2013

FYI- I printed out the supplemental content in the three notes per string lesson. The full set of scale patterns as well as the Lesson two exercises did not print out completely; they were cut off. They looked fine on the computer screen. It is only printing it out that is a problem. Having the examples on paper is a big help to me when I am initially trying to memorize them and get them under my fingers. Thanks.

doy61doy61 replied on May 27th, 2014

I think the problem is that the tab is only in jpeg and not in pdf. Sure would be nice if you could convert the tab to pdf for better printing.

lonerockerlonerocker replied on January 4th, 2013

I have just started with JamPlay.com. I have used a few different video and audio guitar training products to learn to play the guitar from the very beginning. I have made much progress. However, I have been in a real slump with my playing. So far I am very pleased with the content and quality of teaching in Chris's lessons. Chris's lessons look like they will be a big help to me in improving my playing. There are several playing techniques and concepts that have always given me a hard time. I am hopeful that Chris's course series will help me to finally get some of this stuff under my belt.

hayes grayhayes gray replied on January 6th, 2013

I just started with jamplay.com at the beginning of the year due to being frustrated with my playing. Make sure you jam with other people regularly to help keep fresh. I showed these exercises to a keyboard player I jam with who played professionally during the 80s and he came up with all kinds of variations and then would hold down different chords in the scale so I could hear how the notes sound against the different chords of the scale. Just my $0.02 worth.

akerjakerj replied on January 1st, 2013

Chris, Great lessons. You have a gift as a teacher. Very informative and patient! BTW, what is the name of the song that you play for the introduction of this lesson set? IS there music available? This is a rockin tune! Love your playing. Keep upi the fine work! John

akerjakerj replied on January 14th, 2013

Okay Chris, found the intro music in lesson 13. Not guilty of skipping around the lesson set. I really enjoy your teaching style. Hopefully my speed will improve. up to 100 bpm on 3 string scales

donnydarkodonnydarko replied on December 22nd, 2012

This is what I've been searching for. Great stuff!

Albertoj602Albertoj602 replied on December 16th, 2012

Hey chris, I've learned all the shapes you have given in the first scenes of the video, do I really need to play them like you do? because i can't play them that fast!!

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on December 17th, 2012

Moving on would be a good idea. Improving accuracy and speed is an ongoing process. As you move on, keep practicing these and you'll notice substantial improvements over time!

reganrawrreganrawr replied on December 3rd, 2012

First lick is sweet.

dean1101dean1101 replied on October 21st, 2012

Hi,the lessons are great can you please remind me what's the diffrence between the major and penatonic scale. Thanks.

dean1101dean1101 replied on October 21st, 2012

Hi,the lessons are great can you please remind me what's the diffrence between the major and penatonic scale. Thanks.

dave simsdave sims replied on May 21st, 2012

Ooops must have pushed the button twice, Sorry

dave simsdave sims replied on May 21st, 2012

Hi chris and fellow students, just wondering if it is of any benifit when we are working our way up or down the neck like in this lesson, and say we are in the key of G, to emphasise on our key note or root when we approach it by picking it twice or resting on it briefly, this feels natural for me and helps me remember where the notes are, should i be doing this chris? or should i just be working on memorizing these paterns first.

dave simsdave sims replied on May 21st, 2012

Hi chris and fellow students, just wondering if it is of any benifit when we are working our way up or down the neck like in this lesson, and say we are in the key of G, to emphasise on our key note or root when we approach it by picking it twice or resting on it briefly, this feels natural for me and helps me remember where the notes are, should i be doing this chris? or should i just be working on memorizing these paterns first.

JacoJaco replied on May 19th, 2012

Hi There Chris. Do you have the Guitar Pro tab files for your sessions. I have a Fretlight guitar that lights up the fret board and would love to get the tabs to help me even more. I could type it all up my self but if you have the files it would save me a lot of time. Kiond Regards.

ebert5150ebert5150 replied on May 16th, 2012

Ouch! I'm new to guitar and I'm having a heck of a time making the stretch from fret 3 to 7 without moving my hand. Is this a common problem? Do you have any suggestions for increasing my finger span? Thanks and great lesson.

mennacemennace replied on April 9th, 2012

ive been spending much on the CAGE system lead and can play them decently up and down the fretboard. how does this scale relate to the cage lead scales? i'm trying to see some similarity so i can figure this out faster but i cant, so i guess these are two different animals so to speak.

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on April 12th, 2012

these scales are just a different way of approaching the same thing. The CAGED scales follow basic chord shapes, where as these use the 3/string way of doing things. Both are great to know and serve slightly different purposes for phrasing and lead ideas

esalikli1205esalikli1205 replied on December 13th, 2012

I would very much like to learn the pattern, but I don't see how I can make it stick in my head (and hands). Is there some way you can help me learn this? I'm singing Do Re Mi etc but that seems super clumsy.

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on December 17th, 2012

try singing in numbers :) instead of do re mi... sing 1 2 3 4 etc... this really helps me. I never got the sound of music thing either :)

metsrokmetsrok replied on April 1st, 2012

hey chris! great lesson! i understand how these shapes are movable if u use a different scale, but what do u do with a scale whose root is on the 5th string? for example a scale in the key of D major. on the 6th root its the 10th fret so theres not enough room to do the full shape. what then?

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on April 2nd, 2012

If the root is on the 5th string and there is no root on the 6th string, the scale can still be moved and you are still playing the whole position if you play all the strings. More clearly stated (hopefully) you'd still play notes in the given scale on strings below the string containing the lowest root. I just released new lessons on Major scales talking specifically about position playing. They are in my phase 1 series and I believe are still on the "recent news" feed. Let me know if you have any other questions!

metsrokmetsrok replied on April 2nd, 2012

thanx for helping but what I'm really asking is how i can take all 8 shapes that u gave us for G and use it for lets say B. theres not enough room on the fretboard to go so far. what then? also, if i were to start on the A string then i don't hav enough strings to do the shapes because u use all 6. what should i do there too?

tonydurranttonydurrant replied on March 17th, 2012

Hi Chris This lesson is going well, but I am having trouble with the alternate picking. What I seem to do (on the 3 on a string scale) is on the way up, I pick the 1st and 3rd note on each string with a down stroke, and on the way back I seem to pick the 1st and 3rd note with an up stroke. My brain is telling me that it is quicker to get to the next string if the pick is going in the right direction. Why is this a bad thing ?. Tony

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on April 2nd, 2012

yeah, thats natural. Keep it slow, and it will start to feel more comfortable as you do it more. You're struggling with the age-old: outside vs. inside picking deal. If you want, in my phase 1, I have a lesson dedicated to alternate picking. It may be of some help to you. It offers some basic drills to help make this stuff feel a little easier.

bbkregerbbkreger replied on February 13th, 2012

I've been doing these daily for about 6 months now -- it really impresses everyone I know :) even some veteran guitar players who "never learned that stuff" !? surprised me.. one had me get him started on it and he's working it everyday now too.. lots of fun, great stuff. i'm working your other lessons too, but wanted to take a moment and say, thanks chris!

iter8iter8 replied on January 15th, 2012

The exercise sequences are really great for practicing these scale shapes in a musical context, especially over the backing tracks. I've also found it useful to pick 2 adjacent strings and run up and down the neck in a given key. The legato lick is a lot of fun to play, but it can be a bit of a workout!

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on January 23rd, 2012

hehe, yes! be careful!

kribblekribble replied on January 20th, 2012

ok, so here's my simple and maybe a little dumb question, and im willing to hang my head in shame if im missing something obvious. The example you play in the 4 note per string sequence is in 16th notes, but the jam track grooves at a steady quarter note. i've played the violin for over 10 years and im going on year 3 of self taught guitar, and i've always had this same problem. it's sooo hard for me to sub divide in my head, eighth notes i can do, but 16ths just won't come to me. i always end up cranking up my metronome to like 240 bpm and then setting it to click on the eighth notes too when im trying to do 16ths at 120bpm. i was wondering if you could point me towards some lessons or ideas to help me improve on this. I love your teaching style and it seems that every time i go to a lesson series that interests me your the instructor. You make great lessons. the reason this question appears here is because i listened to you play through the jam track and then went down to give it a try and i just got lost when i tried to go faster than 8th note divisions

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on January 23rd, 2012

good questions! I have struggled with this too. For help on subdividing, check out my phase 1 series. I have a lesson that is completely dedicated to beat subdividing. It is presented from the angle of strumming, but once you are able to get the feel of what it's like to properly subdivide at different tempos a little better, you can feel more comfortable with the stuff in this lesson. hope this helps! let me know if you have any more questions!

kribblekribble replied on January 24th, 2012

Thanks Chris! I'll go check it out ASAP. It's that 3rd beat in every measure, it always seems to beep a 16th too soon! But I'm almost there. I've been stuck on this lesson for weeks now, but I'm loving every minute of it. It's forced me to polish up on keeping things clean with my palm and really work on my timing. But best of all, it's gotten me out of the proverbial "stuck to the positions" rut. Really a great lesson, and I'm very much looking forward to the rest of the series.

kribblekribble replied on January 20th, 2012

im new to jamplay so sorry bout the long question and the unexplained double post, so just disregard most of that, i think the easiest way to help me and still stay in the context of lesson would be for me to ask, how long are you holding the slides, is it just for that 3-e-&-a and you start going back down and the 4-e-&-a or do you just hold long enough and start doing back down on the 1-e-&-a

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on January 23rd, 2012

as you transition from each position, the "slide" i think you are referring to is is held as a quarter note.

kribblekribble replied on January 20th, 2012

ok, so here's my simple and maybe a little dumb question, and im willing to hang my head in shame if im missing something obvious. The example you play in the 4 note per string sequence is in 16th notes, but the jam track grooves at a steady quarter note. i've played the violin for over 10 years and im going on year 3 of self taught guitar, and i've always had this same problem. it's sooo hard for me to sub divide in my head, eighth notes i can do, but 16ths just won't come to me. i always end up cranking up my metronome to like 240 bpm and then setting it to click on the eighth notes too when im trying to do 16ths at 120bpm. i was wondering if you could point me towards some lessons or ideas to help me improve on this. I love your teaching style and it seems that every time i go to a lesson series that interests me your the instructor. You make great lessons. the reason this question appears here is because i listened to you play through the jam track and then went down to give it a try and i just got lost when i tried to go faster than 8th note divisions

dearlpittsdearlpitts replied on January 15th, 2012

wow really wow-such really good stuff-glad your here

iter8iter8 replied on January 10th, 2012

This is a question rather than a comment. Is the primary purpose of approaching the major scale from each of the key's degrees (rather than say just learning 5 patterns) to set us up for better understanding application of modes? I'm trying to understand why the fretboard often gets divided up differently.

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on January 10th, 2012

thats partially why, but the main benefit learning the positions from each scale degree is that you know how to play any major scale ANYWHERE on the neck. This will help with modes down the road also, but even when you're not playing especially modally, you'll notice a great deal of freedom once you've committed these patterns to memory and are regularly applying them in your playing.

iter8iter8 replied on January 10th, 2012

First off, thanks for the prompt response! This is probably a dumb follow-up, but are these shapes all interchangeable at a given scale degree? For example, suppose I'm in A. The second scale degree of A would be B. I would use the same second pattern you used in the G example (the one at A) except now I would be playing it at the B, 7th fret?

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on January 10th, 2012

sounds like you understand the application perfectly! Feel free to stop by my live chats sometime if you haven't already!

drdeathdrdeath replied on November 28th, 2011

Dude, you have helped me so much after just watching a small amount of time, thankyou

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on November 29th, 2011

you are welcome!

gabriel clementgabriel clement replied on November 27th, 2011

could you add the tabs for this lesson

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on November 28th, 2011

check the supplemental content tab. Its all there

joshmacsweenjoshmacsween replied on October 7th, 2011

Hey, chris, great lesson, i was really impressed when i suddenly got comfortable with theese shapes, playing with them on jamtracks in G major. Now im trying to sound out three on a string scales minor style.

brandonl15brandonl15 replied on October 4th, 2011

great lesson!!!!!!!!

midlifemidlife replied on September 22nd, 2011

Chris, is the Legato Exercised tabbed out? I see the Satriani-Like Legato lick under Supplemental Content but I don't see the Legato exercise you teach in scene 5? By the way, amazing lesson set. I play mostly metal and was skeptical when I saw Instrumental Rock. Boy was I wrong. It has taken me a couple of weeks just to work through the 16th note and triplet exercises. Already my play has drastically improved.

midlifemidlife replied on September 25th, 2011

Disregard my question about tabbing out the Legato exercise. Pretty straight forward using the 3 on a string scales already tabbed out. Exercise is killing my fingers, especially descending the scale from high e to low E.

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on September 30th, 2011

glad you're enjoying the series! The exercises are tabbed out under "16th note ex" in the supp content.

jasonconfusedjasonconfused replied on August 9th, 2011

I can't seem to get myself to start a string picking up. I alternate pick each string but I start each with a downstroke :/

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on August 13th, 2011

it's good to be able to do what you are describing too. When it comes to alternate picking, the slower the better if you're dealing with not being able to switch strings without getting tripped up

gabrielcallejagabrielcalleja replied on August 11th, 2011

Excellent lesson Chris!!! Metal Mike of Guitar world did something similar to your 4 note playing using the pentatonic scale!!

jj90jj90 replied on July 16th, 2011

Hey Chris, this is my first time on Jamplay but as an intermediate player this stuff is awesome! I'm already familiar with all 5 positions the major scale so I can definitely recognize those. Really nice that the backing track are accompanied with this lessons in all sorts of tempos/keys. Really need to get practicing! Thanks

tammy7689tammy7689 replied on June 23rd, 2011

i can't print out the jimmy-page like sequence.....when i click on it to view print its blank???

alanloweryalanlowery replied on May 12th, 2011

Chris, I have been skirting this stuff for years. I can feel an improvement already and haven't even touched the sequences yet. This will keep me trucking for months to come. Thanks for the great lesson. I look forward to more. Alan

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on May 23rd, 2011

I'm glad Alan! Yes, I still use this stuff every day of my practicing and it keeps the dexterity up and is pretty musical.

krasmankrasman replied on May 23rd, 2011

are these scales tabbed out. i think im missing some of the supplemental content.

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on May 23rd, 2011

yep, they are under the supplemental content tab labeled "3-on-a-string scales"

costigtcostigt replied on May 22nd, 2011

Been skirting the doe ray me scale for years, tks for expanding the full length of the neck.

azri13azri13 replied on May 10th, 2011

by the way.this scale is movable right?

azri13azri13 replied on May 10th, 2011

this is what i've been looking for....thanks chris.

jesperlindejesperlinde replied on March 24th, 2011

love the backing track im down on sequences but this is a very helpful way to practise anyway. Shifting in notes per beat and scales positions makes this awesome. Good work Chris, Really..

krazyfngazkrazyfngaz replied on March 22nd, 2011

Hi Chris....I over reacted, i sat down and tried these again and it magically got easier. Your enthusiasm for teaching makes it more fun to learn, so thanks. Really looking forward to the rest of the series

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on March 22nd, 2011

ha! good! Yeah, these exercises offer a surprisingly fast reward if you're consistent with them. Practice phrasing ideas over the multiple tempo backing tracks provided. It really helps create a musical context right from the very beginning!

tomruggieritomruggieri replied on March 22nd, 2011

Thanks for going to the trouble of setting up all the backing tracks with the different tempos and keys. Like a metronome with music. Great idea! A much more enjoyable and useful way to learn. BTW, I'm still waiting for the next Pro Tools article in your home recording series. I found those articles very helpful as a novice trying to figure it all out. But, then, the articles just stopped. Will they ever resume? Jason Mounce had some good articles as well and his articles just stopped coming as well. Did Pro Tools politely tell you to cease and desist or was there some other reason why the articles all of a sudden stopped?

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on March 22nd, 2011

You are welcome! We haven't forgotten about the recording stuff. There is actually a video series scheduled that will be dealing with mic and recording techniques. Good to know that you enjoyed the Pro Tools specific stuff though. I had taken a break from that series while the transition was happening from Pro Tools 8 to 9 because I didn't want to write anything that would be out-dated or 'wrong' once everyone switched to 9. Maybe it's time for another one soon!

krazyfngazkrazyfngaz replied on March 22nd, 2011

Great lesson.....please slow down though, this lesson alone will take me 2 months to get down

Chris.LiepeChris.Liepe replied on March 22nd, 2011

There is a lot to work on here! Not every lesson in this series will have this much to play and learn. Take it slow, make these sequences part of your daily practice and you'll be amazed at how quickly they come. Also, you won't have to "get these down" before moving on to the next lesson. You can be working on refining your technique and understanding as you are moving forward in the series. Thanks for all the great Q&A ??'s too!! It's been fun having you in the sessions!

tammy7689tammy7689 replied on March 21st, 2011

great first lesson chris!!!!.......i love the way you teach.....really looking forward to this series

Rock Guitar with Chris Liepe

Found in our Beginner Lesson Sets

Instrumental Rock carries with it many creative aspects both in writing and playing. By the end of this series, Chris will have covered almost everything you will need to know to create and play your very own melodic instrumental rock piece, with emotion!



Lesson 1

Rock Essentials Introduction

Chris Liepe introduces his Phase 2 Rock Essentials lesson series. By highlighting specific instrumental rock styles and techniques, Chris will help you become a more melodically creative player.

Length: 3:57 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Lesson 2

3 on a String Scales

Chris Liepe starts off his Rock Essentials series with a lesson on 3 on a string scales. Utilizing 3, 4, and 6 note sequencing, Chris begins to dive into instrumental rock style phrasing and provides several...

Length: 37:00 Difficulty: 3.5 Members Only
Lesson 3

Pentatonic Scales, Sequencing, and Lick Ideas

Chris introduces the pentatonic scales as well as some of their basic applications.

Length: 19:35 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 4

Chord Numbering

Chris Liepe takes some time to explain chord numbering. Understanding how chords are built will only help in your overall knowledge of the guitar.

Length: 16:25 Difficulty: 2.5 Members Only
Lesson 5

The CAGED System

Chris breaks down the CAGED system and its chord chemistry. He covers both major and minor chord forms.

Length: 35:06 Difficulty: 3.5 Members Only
Lesson 6

Sweep Picking

Chris digs into the sweep picking technique. He uses the C, A, and E forms introduced in the previous lesson to help with finger synchronization.

Length: 27:15 Difficulty: 3.0 Members Only
Lesson 7

Introduction to Modes

Chris moves on to the subject of modes. He explains where modes come from, how they sound, and how they are used.

Length: 30:04 Difficulty: 4.0 Members Only
Lesson 8

Modal Pentatonic Scales

This lesson demonstrates how to modify the old trusty 5th fret A minor pentatonic position to make it sound modal.

Length: 10:30 Difficulty: 3.5 Members Only
Lesson 9

Modal Chord Progressions

How do you know which mode to use? There are giveaways with every chord progression, and Chris covers them in this lesson.

Length: 17:12 Difficulty: 4.0 Members Only
Lesson 10

Complete Major / Minor Scale Using Penatonic Scales

Chris demonstrates how to complete the major and minor scale by using pentatonic positions based on the roots of the I, IV, and V chords.

Length: 14:52 Difficulty: 4.5 Members Only
Lesson 11

Melodic Development

Chris Liepe utilizes everything he has taught in the series so far to demonstrate how to create catchy lead lines over a backing track.

Length: 15:30 Difficulty: 4.0 Members Only
Lesson 12

Implied Tonalities

Chris Liepe delves into the world of implied tonalities. This lesson details how a single arpeggio can be implied over various chordal sounds.

Length: 25:40 Difficulty: 4.0 Members Only
Lesson 13

Series Introduction Solo Lesson (Composed Soloing)

Chris teaches the solo that was used in the introduction lesson for this series. He uses the solo as an example of how to effectively compose your own solos.

Length: 22:09 Difficulty: 3.5 Members Only
Lesson 14

2 Hand Tapping

It's time to give the right hand hand some work with two hand tapping on the guitar neck.

Length: 31:26 Difficulty: 3.5 Members Only
Lesson 15

Thoughts on Practice

With so much material out there, what should you focus on? How much time do you spend on a certain topic? How do you progress? How do you measure progress? Chris covers all of these topics in this lesson.

Length: 17:16 Difficulty: 1.0 Members Only
Lesson 16

Get to Know Chris Liepe

Chris Liepe offers up some insight into his past. Hopefully this lesson will help you further your own goals as a guitarist.

Length: 11:42 Difficulty: 0.5 Members Only

About Chris Liepe View Full Biography Chris Liepe was born on September 17th, 1981 in Portland OR. His first instrument was piano which he pursued until discovering his love for the electric guitar in high school. He became fans of such groups as Soundgarden, Collective Soul and U2 inspiring him to start singing, songwriting and helping others in their musical endeavors with teaching, co-writing and album production.

Having moved to Colorado with his family, he began gigging, recording and teaching in a number of music stores as well as out of his apartment until deciding to pursue music full time. He moved to Denver, CO to complete a Bachelors in Music Technology and was then hired on by Sweetwater Productions, a division of Sweetwater Sound and one of the largest, most successful recording studios in the Midwest.

Chris spent nearly 4 years at Sweetwater as a producer, recording engineer, studio musician and writer. During this time he had the privilege of working with many artists including Augustana, Landon Pigg, Jars of Clay, and Mercy Me. He also wrote for and played on numerous independent albums and hundreds of radio/TV commercials.

Wanting to get back to his favorite State in the world (Colorado) and feeling the urge to 'go freelance', Chris moved to Greeley, CO and opened his own recording and teaching studio. He continues to write and produce music for artists and agencies and is happy to be among the proud JamPlay.com instructors.

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