The Power of Three Notes

Skill Building Guitar Course from Horace Bray

As guitarists, we tend to memorize shapes without ever really knowing why. The goal of this course is to provide guitarists with the fundamentals to “see” the skeletal structure of the chords and scales they already know, in order to unlock new shapes and sounds. Horace Bray delivers an all-encompassing course on triads; one of the cornerstones of unlocking melody and harmony across the neck.

41 Lessons

Complete course with step-by-step lessons and practice examples.

Multi-Camera

Course filmed with 6 cameras for the perfect angles.

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Tabs & Info

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Full Course Breakdown

Horace offers a fresh approach for becoming a more cerebral guitarist. We will learn the basic open and closed triad shapes, discover how to use them together to “push and pull” the harmony, and give examples on how to create new 3 note clusters to describe more modern sounds.

Begin the Course
1

The Power of Three Notes Introduction

As guitarists, we tend to memorize shapes without ever really knowing why. The goal of this course is to provide guitarists with the fundamentals to “see” the skeletal structure of the chords and scales they already know, in order to unlock new shapes and sounds. Horace Bray delivers an all-encompassing course on triads; one of the cornerstones of unlocking melody and harmony across the neck.

1:48 Runtime

0.0 Difficulty

2

Closed G Major Triads for Bottom Strings

Horace gets right to it teaching closed G major triads in all three inversions. You start by focusing on the 6th, 5th and 4th string groupings. These shapes will form the basis moving forward.

5:03 Runtime

2.0 Difficulty

3

Closed G Major Triads for Middle Strings (5-3)

Horace continues his teaching on the closed G Major triads. Just like the previous lesson, you will learn these shapes for root, 1st and 3rd position. These triads will be on the 5th, 4th and 3rd string group.

3:29 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

4

Closed G Major Triads for Middle Strings (4-2)

We continue on the closed G Major triads. Just like the previous lesson, you will learn these shapes for root, 1st and 3rd position. These triads will be on the 4th, 3rd and 2nd string group.

4:00 Runtime

2.0 Difficulty

5

Closed G Major Triads for Top Strings

And finally, we move to the 3rd, 2nd and 1st strings to finalize our movement across the strings. These will require some practice and memorization before moving to our next lesson.

4:16 Runtime

2.0 Difficulty

6

Closed Triad G Major Arpeggios

Now that you have learned the G major closed triads across the neck and in all inversions, it's time to apply these as arpeggios. Horace discusses the arpeggio and ways to play them across the neck. The goal is to help you get a grasp of how to connect the individual triads into bigger arpeggios, emphasizing the importance of “using your ear” and how to not get boxed in.

9:07 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

7

Open G Major Triads for Bottom Strings

Horace teaches the open G major triad groupings with exercises and examples. Unlike the closed voicing G major triads, the open voicings will cover four instead of three strings. To start you will learn the voicings for the 6th, 5th, 4th and 3rd string group.

6:04 Runtime

2.0 Difficulty

8

Open G Major Triads for Strings 5-2

Horace continues to teach the open voicing G major triads and the root, 1st and 2nd inversion. This time on the 5th, 4th, 3rd and 2nd string group. We will talk about the different fingerings and ways to practice the shapes.

7:24 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

9

Open G Major Triads for Top Strings

And lastly.. you guessed it, triads on the final top strings. Hopefully by now you are beginning to recognize how these are formed, and have been following the advice on how to "get them under your fingers" with provided examples.

4:41 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

10

Major Arpeggio Etude

Horace provides a short etude on how to practice connecting the different shapes of the G Major open triads. This helps you visualize the shapes together as well as helps with right hand picking. Use the provided tabs and start slowly!

5:28 Runtime

3.0 Difficulty

View this Lesson
11

Closed A Minor Triads for Bottom Strings

It is time to start looking at minor triad voicings. To get started, Horace will teach the root, 1st and 2nd inversions of the A minor closed triads. Like the G major closed triads, you will start with the 6th, 5th and 4th string group. Reference the provided tabs for your practice sessions.

3:10 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

12

Closed A Minor Triads for Middle Strings (5-3)

Lesson 12 picks up the A minor closed triads, now starting on the 5th, 4th and 3rd string group. Just like the previous lesson, you will be learning the closed triad voicings in root, 1st and 2nd inversion.

3:22 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

13

Closed A Minor Triads for Middle Strings (4-2)

We move to the next set of strings, with the 4th, 3rd and 2nd. By now, you will start to see the differences between minor and major shapes.

3:17 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

14

Closed A Minor Triads for Top Strings

Lesson 14 picks up the A minor closed triads, now starting on the 3rd, 2nd and 1st string group. Be sure to begin comparing these to the major patterns we learned in the last grouping.

2:52 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

15

Minor Arpeggio Etude

Finally we use another etude to practice connecting these shapes, and more importantly, the function of each triad across the neck. Refer to the provided tabs for independent practice.

7:02 Runtime

3.0 Difficulty

16

Open A Minor Triads for Bottom Strings

As you did previously, lesson 16 looks at open voiced triads, this time for A minor. Learn the shapes and fingerings for the root, 1st and 2nd inversion open A minor triads, starting on the 6th, 5th, 4th and 3rd string group.

4:26 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

17

Open A Minor Triads for Middle Strings

Lesson 17 continues your learning of the open A minor triad voicings. Learn the root, 1st and 2nd inversion voicings, this time on the 5th, 4th, 3rd and 2nd string grouping.

2:57 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

18

Open A Minor Triads for Top Strings

Are you seeing the patterns? Moving to the 4th, 3rd, 2nd and 1st strings, we will again learn the root, 1st, and 2nd inversions.

3:07 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

19

Minor Arpeggio Exercise

Now that you have learned the A minor open voicing triads, we transfer that knowledge to open minor arpeggios. Just like with the closed voice, minor triad arpeggios, you will be playing along with Horace to apply what you have learned.

5:28 Runtime

3.0 Difficulty

20

Closed Triad Pairings

Lesson 20 starts to look at harmonic movement between chords. Using the G major and A minor closed triad voicings, Horace discusses using both of these to create interesting harmonic movement. You will review the shapes, then practice a quick example.

8:08 Runtime

3.0 Difficulty

21

Open Triad Pairings

Just like the previous lesson, you will now be looking at triad pairs for the open voicings of G major and A minor. Once again, Horace will review the open voiced shapes, then provide examples on how to create harmonic movement with the different triads.

6:08 Runtime

3.0 Difficulty

22

Change One Note!

Horace introduces the concept of making a single note change to the triad formation to create an entirely new triad. You will be utilizing this concept in the next section of learning for this course.

1:53 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

23

G Major Clusters for Bottom Strings

Now that Horace has gone over the 1, 3, 4 cluster in the previous lesson, it's time to start taking a look at these voicings in root, 1st and 2nd inversion. This lesson will start with the 6th, 5th and 4th string group.

6:17 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

24

G Major Clusters for Strings 5-3

We pick up the 1-3-4 cluster learning that you started in the previous lesson. Learn the cluster voicings for root, 1st and 2nd inversion, this time for the 5th, 4th and 3rd string grouping.

4:06 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

25

G Major Clusters for Strings 4-2

We move to the next set of strings, with the 4th, 3rd and 2nd. By now, you will start to see the differences between minor and major shapes.

4:07 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

26

G Major Clusters for Top Strings

Lesson 26 picks up the 1-3-4 cluster learning that you started in lesson 25. Here, we learn the cluster voicings for root, 1st and 2nd inversion, this time for the 3rd, 2nd and 1st string grouping.

4:14 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

27

G Major 1-3-4 Arpeggio Connector

To start off, Horace will discuss the 3 note groupings for chords 1, 3 and 4 as well as how to arpeggiate them. He will follow up with a more advanced arpeggio pattern based on the original pattern discussed. Tabs are provided to work through both ascending and descending the lines.

7:41 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

28

G Major Open Clusters for Bottom Strings

We take the concepts learned in the previous cluster lessons, but this time from an open 1-3-4 perspective. Horace will provide play along examples to help get these under your fingers.

5:45 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

29

G Major Open Clusters for Middle Strings

Horace provides another example of how landing points function within triads.

4:32 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

30

G Major Open Clusters for Top Strings

A final example demonstrating this concept. Refer to the provided tab to navigate the fretboard and perfect these concepts.

4:11 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

31

Open Cluster Landing Points

Now that we have looked at closed and open cluster voicings in the previous lessons, Horace discusses "Landing Points" for those voicings. He provides examples and discusses the concept.

3:48 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

32

A Minor 1-b3-4 Arpeggio

Horace discusses the 3 note groupings for the 1-b3-4 A minor arpeggio. Just like lesson 23 that covers the G major arpeggio, Horace will provide examples to help you with this concept.

6:30 Runtime

3.0 Difficulty

33

A Minor Clusters for Bottom Strings

Now that Horace has gone over the 1, b3, 4 cluster in the previous lesson, it's time to start taking a look at these voicings in root, 1st and 2nd inversion. This lesson will start with the 6th, 5th and 4th string group.

4:55 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

34

A Minor Clusters for Strings 5-3

Lesson 33 picks up the 1-b3-4 cluster learning that you started in the previous lesson. Learn the cluster voicings for root, 1st and 2nd inversion, this time for the 5th, 4th and 3rd string grouping.

4:25 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

35

A Minor Clusters for Strings 4-2

We move to the next set of strings, with the 4th, 3rd and 2nd. By now, you will start to see the differences between minor and major shapes.

3:35 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

36

A Minor Clusters for Top Strings

Lesson 35 picks up the 1-b3-4 cluster learning that you started on Lesson 33. Learn the cluster voicings for root, 1st and 2nd inversion, this time for the 3rd, 2nd and 1st string grouping.

4:22 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

37

Open A Minor Altered Triads for Bottom Strings

In lesson 37, we take the concepts learned in the previous cluster lessons, but this time from an open 1-b3-4 perspective. Horace will provide play along examples to help get these under your fingers.

4:45 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

38

Open A Minor Altered Triads for Middle Strings

We continue to work on the 1-b3-4 open cluster examples. Horace provides another example to help hone your skills with this concept.

4:27 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

39

Open A Minor Altered Triads for Top Strings

In lesson 39, you continue to work on the 1-b3-4 open cluster examples. Horace provides another example to help hone your skills with this concept.

4:51 Runtime

2.5 Difficulty

40

Open A Minor Altered Triad Landing Points

Now that we have looked at closed and open cluster voicings for A minor, in the previous lessons, Horace discusses "Landing Points" for those voicings. He provides examples and discusses the concept.

2:08 Runtime

3.0 Difficulty

41

Combining Elements and Final Thoughts

In lesson 41, Horace wraps up his triad based series with a look at the G major and A minor cluster pairs. He demonstrates and discusses this concept like he did with the open and closed triad pairs.

9:19 Runtime

3.0 Difficulty

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  • Los Angeles, CA
  • Playing since 2005
  • 71 lessons at JamPlay
Born on December 24th , 1991 in Los Angeles, California, Horace Bray began playing drums at age 10 but later picked up guitar at age 14 when he was living in St. Louis, Missouri. His first guitar teacher was Corey Christiansen, who he studied with privately for a year. Bray cites Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck as his earliest guitar influences before discovering jazz through his lessons with Christiansen. “I was really into Grant Green and Wes Montgomery early on, then got deeply into Kurt Rosenwinkel in high school,” he recalls.

Born on December 24th , 1991 in Los Angeles, California, Horace Bray began playing drums at age 10 but later picked up guitar at age 14 when he was living in St. Louis, Missouri. His first guitar teacher was Corey Christiansen, who he studied with privately for a year. Bray cites Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck as his earliest guitar influences before discovering jazz through his lessons with Christiansen. “I was really into Grant Green and Wes Montgomery early on, then got deeply into Kurt Rosenwinkel in high school,” he recalls. Bray was involved in an after-school jazz program run by Jazz St. Louis and was a part of their top group taught by guitarist Rick Hayden. “I chose to leave Missouri for college because I needed a change in my life and a kick in the ass to push me to get better,” Bray says. In 2010, he enrolled at the University of North Texas, where he played with the UNT Jazz Singers, the Four O’Clock Lab Band, the Two O’Clock Lab Band and the One O’clock Lab Band (as the first undergrad guitarist in 15 years to hold the guitar chair in that prestigious group) before graduating in 2015. “My time at UNT was good and I met a lot of great musicians and people there,” says Bray. “Being around people like professors Ed Soph and Stefan Karlsson was really inspiring.”
Reviews & Feedback 97/100 with 117 ratings
LucaZeeM

and I like the teacher too :)

Guitarfish64

Really brings together a bunch of things I half undersood

G the wildman

Easy to listen to. Seems to enjoy teaching.

Reynaerde

Great way to find your way on the fretboard, playing different sounds within one key.

milocangemi

This lesson is great, horace is an amazing guitarist. He really knows how to make a guitar sing

Neurocardio

i would like to address all 3 options of choice: 1. like the teacher 2. easy to understand 3. its what i needed

RBorg77

I'm generally fascinated with music theory and numerical/spatial relationships. looking forward to the next lesson. kudos.

MatthewBuri

It was great to see Horace jamming out to the concepts he taught in the lessons. Great Job to all involved!

ChrisOraz

Very cool!